Election 2010 Lookahead: Friday 16 April

The who, when and where of the campaign.

Liberal Democrats

A busy day ahead for Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg, who will be campaigning in Warrington and Hull today, stopping off at Warrington Rugby League Football Club to meet the team with Lib Dem candidate for Warrington South, Jo Crotty, at the Halliwell Jones Stadium in Warrington (10am) and meeting engineers at a training session at HETA Hull on Copenhagen Road in Hull with the Lib Dem candidate for Hull North, Denis Healy (1.45pm).

He will also take part in an online Q&A with students on online forum The Student Room.

Conservatives

A quiet day for the Conservative party folowing yesterday evening's televised election debate. Travel delays caused by the Icelandic ash cloud may affect campaigning.

Labour

A quiet day for the Labour party folowing yesterday evening's televised election debate. Travel delays caused by the Icelandic ash cloud may affect campaigning. Labour will air an election broadcast on BBC Two (7.55pm), ITV1 (6.25pm), BBC1, (6.55pm), Five (7.25pm) and Channel 4 (7.55pm).

Other parties

Plaid Cymru will air an election broadcast on Channel Five (7.55pm).

The Media

Expect analysis of yesterday evening's televised election debate on ITV with Prime Minister Gordon Brown, Conservative Party leader David Cameron and Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg to enter full swing. R4's Today programme interviews representatives of minor parties including the BNP, UKIP, Green Party, SNP and Plaid Cymru.Some repite from television coverage this evening of the three main parties following yesterday evening's debate.

Away from the campaign

The Broadway theatre in Barking is to host 'Spin The Election', a festival of arts described as 'an artistic response to all the hype and hubris' of the 6 May general election. Barking is the constituency in which BNP leader Nick Griffin is standing against Labour incumbent Margaret Hodge. It will open with 'A Day at the Racists', a new piece of political theatre about the rise of the BNP by Anders Lustgarten.

In Wales today an 84-year old is due to be sentenced for planting a revenge bomb after he was overcharged by his dentist. Peter McShane, 84, of Pembroke Dock, Wales, will be sentenced on eight charges. He planted a fake bomb outside the surgery, glued up the locks and stole a wall plaque following a visit to the dentist in 2007 when he was charged £183.

 

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Donald Trump promises quick Brexit trade deal - but the pound still falls

The incoming President was talking to cast out Brexiteer, Michael Gove. 

The incoming President, Donald Trump, told the Brexiteer Michael Gove he would come up with a UK-US trade deal that was "good for both sides".

The man who styled himself "Mr Brexit" praised the vote in an interview for The Times

His belief that Britain is "doing great" is in marked contrast to the warning of current President, Barack Obama, that Brexit would put the country "at the back of the queue" for trade deals.

But while Brexiteers may be chuffed to have a friend in the White House, the markets think somewhat differently.

Over the past few days, reports emerged that the Prime Minister, Theresa May, is to outline plans for a "hard Brexit" with no guaranteed access to the single market in a speech on Tuesday.

The pound slipped to its lowest level against the dollar in three months, below $1.20, before creeping up slightly on Monday.

Nigel Green, founder and chief executive of the financial planners deVere Group, said on Friday: "A hard Brexit can be expected to significantly change the financial landscape. As such, people should start preparing for the shifting environment sooner rather than later."

It's hard to know the exact economic impact of Brexit, because Brexit - officially leaving the EU - hasn't happened yet. Brexiteers like Gove have attacked "experts" who they claim are simply talking down the economy. It is true that because of the slump in sterling, Britain's most international companies in the FTSE 100 are thriving. 

But the more that the government is forced to explain what it is hoping for, the better sense traders have of whether it will involve staying in the single market. And it seems that whatever the President-Elect says, they're not buying it.


 

 

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.