Election 2010 Lookahead: Monday 19 April

The who, when and where of the campaign.

With another 17 days to go in this election campaign, here is what is happening today:

Labour

All Labour cabinet ministers have been recalled to London for an emergency Cobra meeting on the ongoing air chaos. That meeting aside, Health Secretary Andy Burnham is expected to address the Unison health conference (2pm).

Conservatives

The party unveils its manifesto for Scotland today. Meanwhile, Shadow Foreign Secretary William Hague goes up against his counterparts Foreign Secretary David Miliband and Liberal Democrat spokesman Ed Davey in the first The Daily Politics election debates (BBC1, 2.15pm).

Liberal Democrats

Nick Clegg hosts his party's morning press conference in London. Clegg is promising more investment in green jobs and technology.

The media

Radio 4's Today programme "empty chaired" senior Tories this morning after requests for an interview after a difficult weekend for the party were turned down. ConservativeHome's Tim Montgomerie was the stand-in. Later, New Statesman columnist Mike Smithson takes part in a Daily Politics Election Special (BBC2, 11.30am) to explain what the rise of the Lib Dems in the opinion polls (and the betting markets) means. And the repeat of Thursday night's Have I Got News For You (BBC2, 10pm) is worth a watch. Originally broadcast directly against the first leaders' debates, the jokes feel instantly out-dated.

Other parties

Not another party as such, but a campaign for a different kind of politics. Vote for Change is constructing a giant gallows from which an effigy of the Palace of Westminster will be hung. It is, you guessed it, all part of its campaign to achieve a hung parliament on 6 May.

Away from the campaign

Apparently it's International TV Turn-Off Week. Organised by "White Dot", the campaign against television has come at a bad time for Sky News which is hosting the second leaders' debate this Thursday (Sky News, 8pm). Assuming people take up the campaign's cause.

 

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Jon Bernstein, former deputy editor of New Statesman, is a digital strategist and editor. He tweets @Jon_Bernstein. 

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.