The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. We came, we saw, but what did we really learn? (Times)

The third debate showed us that we can immerse ourselves in a warm soup of personality and trivia, says David Aaronovitch. But on the big issues, the leaders won't tell us what we don't want to hear.

2. TV debate: David Cameron faced the job interview of his life. He passed (Guardian)

The political stakes last night were huge -- David Cameron faced the most important job interview of his life. You may not want to know this, says Martin Kettle, but most viewers will judge that he passed.

3. Ultimately, a question of judgement (Independent)

The leading article advises British voters to think long and hard about which party leader on display last night would have the judgement deal with this economic crisis, citing the Conservatives' past poor judgement.

4. Cameron's plans risk a postcode lottery (Financial Times)

Cameron's plans to shrink the size of the state in specific areas contradicts the principle of whereby the distribution of public services is dependent not upon geography but upon need, writes Vernon Bogdanor.

5. Greece shows just why the Celts should be grilled on the BBC (Guardian)

Why should the Scots or Welsh cut jobs if London will pay, Simon Jenkins. Locking the SNP and Plaid Cymru out of the TV debates only feeds this accountability deficit.

6. Cameron is concealing his inner Bush (Independent)

Johann Hari debunks Cameron's claims to be a "compassionate Conservative", looking at four specific policies and finding a cocktail of market fundamentalism, Europhobia, and haranguing of the vulnerable

7. Europe's economy is the sick man of the world (Times)

The eurozone will have to boost economic growth, and, Bill Emmott warns, they must also accept the need to exclude Greece from the euro, at least until it is able to meet the single currency's rules.

8. The crisis will spread without a Plan B (Financial Times)

Nouriel Roubini and Arnab Das discuss the Greek sovereign debt crisis. It might not be too late to avoid a disorderly outcome, if the right steps are taken now.

9. Censorship is in the ascendant (Independent)

The reaction across the political spectrum to the South Park saga has added to its grim comedy, says Terence Blacker. As a culture, we increasingly prefer to play safe and to avoid trouble.

10. Borderline Politics (Times)

The leading article looks at Arizona's ugly new immigration law, which Obama has rightly criticised as deeply un-American.

 

Sign up now to CommentPlus for the pick of the day's opinion, comment and analysis in your inbox at 8am, every weekday.