Cross the Tories with the Saatchis . . . and the poster spoofs begin

Photoshop has its wicked way with the revamped Conservative advertising campaign.

It may have been only 24 hours since the latest Tory poster was unveiled, but has that held back the flood of spoofs? Well, what do you think?

They play a bit fast and loose with the typeface, but it's the message that counts, and I think you'll agree they're pretty witty.

MyDavidCameron.com has started to pull together some of the spoofs, complete with tidied-up Photoshopping.

Here are some of our favourites so far, many of them found on the comment thread for my colleague Jon Bernstein's post yesterday.

Let us know if you can do better.

tory poster4 

By RobinKRS (adapted by MyDavidCameron)

tory poster5 

By kreuzberg_36

Tory poster spoof - Boris

By Robert Egerton

tory poster2 

By JC

And finally, a slightly less optimistic message . . .

tory poster1 

By Dee Bee

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Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.