CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Now "Honest Vince" plays fast and loose (Financial Times)

Vince Cable may be the people's choice for chancellor, but his tax plan is misleading the voters, says Philip Stephens. Only about 6 or 7 per cent of Cable's £16bn income-tax cut would go to the poorest 10 per cent.

2. For the incredible Mr Osborne this may be a zigzag too far (Guardian)

Meanwhile, Polly Toynbee argues that George Osborne will come to regret his extraordinary tax-cut promise. Few voters will believe that he can cut taxes and the deficit at the same time.

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3. Care for the elderly affects us all, and Labour would handle it best after the general election (Daily Telegraph)

Labour's plan for a national care service is a reminder of what politics is for, writes Mary Riddell. But the Tories, committed to an inheritance-tax cut for the richest estates, show no sign of favouring equality in old age.

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4. And I thought the Tories had changed (Independent)

The Tories' inconsistency exposes their lack of principle, writes Steve Richards. The party's latest, rushed tax plan compounds the sense of amateurishness around the leadership.

5. Tories are still failing the Bridget Jones test (Times)

Elsewhere, Rachel Sylvester says voters still feel that Labour represents their values better than the Conservaitves. The recession, which forced the Tories to call for austerity and public spending cuts, has damaged them more than Labour.

6. The euro's big fat failed wedding (Financial Times)

The euro increasingly resembles an unhappy marriage between incompatible partners, writes Gideon Rachman. The old European currencies may be less obsolete than we thought.

7. Why do our paranoid, anti-fun police seem to think they run the country? (Guardian)

The police disrupt peaceful festivals for no obvious purpose other than to spoil people's fun, writes George Monbiot. We need to reassert the right to gather in public spaces.

8. Winston Churchill: an unlikely adviser in the Afghan conflict (Times)

General Stanley McChrystal, commander of US and Nato forces in Afghanistan, is right to return to Churchill's writings for guidance, writes Ben Macintyre.

9. If we're well, we simply don't need medicine (Daily Telegraph)

Pharmaceutical companies are cynically fuelling the demand for "lifestyle drugs", argues James Le Fanu.

10. When authority goes AWOL, savagery fills the gap (Independent)

The tragic murder of Sofyen Belamouadden proves the need to provide proper policing of transport hubs, writes Mary Dejevsky.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.