CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from the Sunday papers.

1. Don't destroy our universities. Our future depends on them (Observer)

With knowledge-intensive work growing ever more important, Will Hutton argues that the government must rethink its stance on university cuts. The inevitable further budget reductions will cause deep damage.

2. The new university challenge is to unravel Labour's mess (Sunday Times)

Minette Marrin looks at Labour's legacy to education -- a disastrous combination of inflation and devaluation. The Blair-Brown years have demonstrated that it is quite easy to bring down standards.

3. For Cable as chancellor, vote Labour (Independent on Sunday)

John Rentoul explores the possibilities of a hung parliament. With such a clunky mechanism, the Lib Dems need Brown to do well if they are to enter a power-sharing deal.

4. Budget 2010: David Cameron prepares for 48-hour trench warfare (Sunday Telegraph)

Labour's last-ditch Budget will herald an artillery battle over Britain's future, says Matthew d'Ancona. Cameron and George Osborne must be honest and detailed in their responses.

5. Do the right thing before you go, Alistair Darling (Sunday Times)

Dominic Lawson agrees that the Chancellor is preparing Wednesday's Budget statement with an eye to posterity. He is a mild-mannered man; if he were more abrasive, he might harangue the public-sector unions picketing the Treasury.

6. Why all these emails from Barack Obama make me feel cheap (Observer)

Andrew Rawnsley says that the internet is undermining old-fashioned campaign models and killing conventional forms of propaganda.

7. Cut off the cash and Israel might behave (Independent on Sunday)

Binyamin Netanyahu is undermining US interests, says Avi Shlaim. The sooner Barack Obama makes his support conditional, the better.

8. Care for the eldely: One question that all our politicians are agreed on (Sunday Telegraph)

Alasdair Palmer wonders how we will fund care for the elderly over the next 20 years -- neither Labour nor the Conservatives has suggested a viable way to fill the funding shortfall.

9. Saying sorry is not enough. The Church has got to change (Observer)

The paper's editorial says Pope Benedict XVI's letter to the Catholics of Ireland was inadequate, and adds to the woes of those his Church has wronged.

10. Health-care reform enters its endgame (Independent on Sunday)

Failure on health-care reform will not break Obama's presidency, says the leading article, but it could alter the political calculus.

Sign up now to CommentPlus for the pick of the day's opinion, comment and analysis in your inbox at 8am, every weekday.

Getty
Show Hide image

Could Jeremy Corbyn still be excluded from the leadership race? The High Court will rule today

Labour donor Michael Foster has applied for a judgement. 

If you thought Labour's National Executive Committee's decision to let Jeremy Corbyn automatically run again for leader was the end of it, think again. 

Today, the High Court will decide whether the NEC made the right judgement - or if Corbyn should have been forced to seek nominations from 51 MPs, which would effectively block him from the ballot.

The legal challenge is brought by Michael Foster, a Labour donor and former parliamentary candidate. Corbyn is listed as one of the defendants.

Before the NEC decision, both Corbyn's team and the rebel MPs sought legal advice.

Foster has maintained he is simply seeking the views of experts. 

Nevertheless, he has clashed with Corbyn before. He heckled the Labour leader, whose party has been racked with anti-Semitism scandals, at a Labour Friends of Israel event in September 2015, where he demanded: "Say the word Israel."

But should the judge decide in favour of Foster, would the Labour leadership challenge really be over?

Dr Peter Catterall, a reader in history at Westminster University and a specialist in opposition studies, doesn't think so. He said: "The Labour party is a private institution, so unless they are actually breaking the law, it seems to me it is about how you interpret the rules of the party."

Corbyn's bid to be personally mentioned on the ballot paper was a smart move, he said, and the High Court's decision is unlikely to heal wounds.

 "You have to ask yourself, what is the point of doing this? What does success look like?" he said. "Will it simply reinforce the idea that Mr Corbyn is being made a martyr by people who are out to get him?"