10 things you need to know about the leaders' debates

Format, length, location, etc.

Thanks to Sky News, we now know the details of the forthcoming party leaders' debates. It's a lengthy old document, but here are the bits you need to know:

  1. Each debate will last 90 minutes.
  2. Alastair Stewart (ITV), Adam Boulton (Sky News) and David Dimbleby (BBC) will be the moderators.
  3. The debates will take place in Manchester (ITV), Bristol (Sky News) and Birmingham (BBC).
  4. The order of the debates will be: ITV (domestic affairs), Sky News (international affairs) and BBC (economic affairs).
  5. The polling firm ICM will manage audience selection: a mix of party supporters, plus 20 per cent undecideds.
  6. The leaders will stand at podiums throughout the debate.
  7. Each leader will have a minute to make opening remarks on the debate topic.
  8. Each leader will have one minute to answer questions.
  9. There will be no ad breaks during the ITV and Sky News debates.
  10. At the end of each programme, the three leaders will shake hands.

Jon Bernstein, former deputy editor of New Statesman, is a digital strategist and editor. He tweets @Jon_Bernstein. 

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Sarah Champion wants to un-resign and join Jeremy Corbyn's shadow cabinet again

The MP is understood to have emailed asking for her job back. 

Sarah Champion, MP for Rotherham, is to rejoin the shadow cabinet less than a month after her dramatic resignation. 

On 28 June, in the aftermath of Brexit, she tweeted: "I have just stepped down from my shadow minister job, but not my responsibilities to my constituents, party or victims of abuse."

Now, she has reportedly emailed Jeremy Corbyn's team to request an un-resignation from her position as shadow minister for preventing abuse. 

According to the Guido Fawkes blog, she wrote: "I would like to formally retract my resignation and ask to be reinstated to my role as Shadow Home Office minister for preventing abuse and domestic violence with immediate effect."

Unsurprisingly, perhaps, given their staffing issues on the shadow cabinet, the Corbyn team is understood to be welcoming her back. 

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell has repeatedly urged ex-shadow cabinet MPs to come back. On 1 July he said: "Wouldn't it be better if people came back and worked with us?"

And on Sunday, he alarmed weekend TV viewers by turning straight to camera and telling the nation: "We've got to stop this now."