This week's New Statesman: the second Falklands war?

Trouble in the Falklands | John Pilger: Why we must resist Murdoch | Terry Eagleton interview.

falklands-5:NS.qxd

This week's New Statesman looks at whether a second Falklands war will be triggered by competition for the islands' oil reserves. In our cover story, Peter Wilby says that the real threat to British control of the islands is diplomatic, not military. Meanwhile, the Labour MP Gerald Kaufman launches a fierce attack on the Obama administration for its neutral stance on the issue.

Elsewhere, our political correspondent, James Macintyre, offers an insider's guide to what he calls "Next Labour". He reports that Douglas Alexander and Ed Miliband are leading the party's post-Brown generation.

In the columns, John Pilger argues that his homeland, Australia, has become the world's first "murdochracy"; Mehdi Hasan reveals how Lord Paul decided to abandon his non-dom tax status; David Blanchflower looks at how the UK's universities compare with the rest of the world's; and Andrew Stephen argues that Obama's presidency can't recover until he removes his troublesome senior aides Rahm Emanuel and David Axelrod.

In The Critics, D J Taylor recalls how Nick Kent and the NME raised rock journalism to an art form; Ryan Gilbey reviews Martin Scorsese's Shutter Island; and the renowned literary critic Terry Eagleton talks to Jonathan Derbyshire about his feud with Martin Amis and Christopher Hitchens.

The issue is on sale now, or you can subscribe through the website.

Sign up now to CommentPlus for the pick of the day's opinion, comment and analysis in your inbox at 8am.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.