Sarah Palin, your guide to Alaska

Watch out, David Attenborough . . .

Brand Palin is a constantly expanding, morphing, multi-tentacled octopus of a situation and we are soon to be presented with its latest incarnation, the nature documentary!

According to rumour, the former governor is asking Discovery for $1.2m per episode for Sarah Palin's Alaska, which would make the series one of the most expensive nature programmes ever made. Obviously none of this is confirmed, but by God if there's even a hint of truth in it then it's pretty astonishing.

The gargantuan sum aside, doesn't Palin prefer to shoot animals rather than observe their idiosyncrasies? I can't really imagine her, Attenborough-style, skulking down on her haunches for hours and whispering at spiders through a bush.

But maybe Sarah will prove her doubters wrong, leading the viewer through the Alaskan wonderland with delicacy. She certainly loves the place, and looks confident in the company of a dead fish. (Atters, I think your nature-doc throne is safe. Panic not.)

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Sophie Elmhirst is features editor of the New Statesman

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.