CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. The Pope, the Prophet and the religious support for evil (Independent)

Johann Hari discusses the Danish Prophet Muhammad cartoons and the revelations about the Catholic Church's cover-up of paedophilia -- religion should not be above the law, or protected from uncomfortable debate or scrutiny.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

2. Darling's Budget could point the way for Britain's renewal (Guardian)

A vision for post-banking-crisis capitalism should be at the top of the agenda, says Martin Kettle, but no party has yet created one. Next week the Chancellor, now his own master, can do so.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

3. Lawyers have no place on the battlefield (Times)

The Court of Appeal's judgment shows no understanding of what soldiers do, says Richard Kemp. In the heat of battle, a commander can't worry about the Human Rights Act -- it would make war impossible.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

4. It really won't be the internet that wins it (Independent)

Talk of the e-election, the Twitter election, or the Facebook election proliferates. But, Mary Dejevsky argues, e-editors are mirrors, not creators, of the negative political climate.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

5. The Lib Dems are talking tough on debt -- but where's the beef? (Daily Telegraph)

Where are the details of the Lib Dems' planned tax cuts, asks Jeff Randall. Politicians won't tell the truth because voters have been infantilised by Labour to believe that it can keep demanding more and more.

6. Like all drugs, miaow-miaow should be legal (Times)

All drugs should be legally available to anyone over the age of 21, says Antonia Senior. Attempting to scare teenagers about the dangers is pointless because their brains are wired to take risks.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

7. Obama should table a Middle East peace plan (Financial Times)

Binyamin Netanyahu is not interested in two-state solutions, says Philip Stephens. What is needed is open recognition in Washington that US interests -- and in the long term those of peace in the region -- would be better served by an even-handed approach.

Read the CommentPlus summary.

8. Europe should rethink its aid to Palestine (Financial Times)

In the same paper, Richard Youngs argues that it is time to stop funding feckless elites -- the way in which such funds have been delivered has deepened the debilitating lack of Palestinian unity.

8. Therapeutic retribution (Guardian)

Libby Brooks looks at a model of restorative justice that holds the offender directly accountable to the people he has harmed. Justice is a public health concern, too: offenders meeting victims can cut the trauma that crime causes.

10. Living and dying (Times)

The leading article applauds Debbie Purdy for bringing courage and optimism to the assisted suicide debate with her struggle to clarify the law, and her articulation of the case for changing it.

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I believe only Yvette Cooper has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy Corbyn

All the recent polling suggests Andy Burnham is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy Corbyn, says Diana Johnson MP.

Tom Blenkinsop MP on the New Statesman website today says he is giving his second preference to Andy Burnham as he thinks that Andy has the best chance of beating Jeremy.

This is on the basis that if Yvette goes out first all her second preferences will swing behind Andy, whereas if Andy goes out first then his second preferences, due to the broad alliance he has created behind his campaign, will all or largely switch to the other male candidate, Jeremy.

Let's take a deep breath and try and think through what will be the effect of preferential voting in the Labour leadership.

First of all, it is very difficult to know how second preferences will switch. From my telephone canvassing there is some rather interesting voting going on, but I don't accept that Tom’s analysis is correct. I have certainly picked up growing support for Yvette in recent weeks.

In fact you can argue the reverse of Tom’s analysis is true – Andy has moved further away from the centre and, as a result, his pitch to those like Tom who are supporting Liz first is now narrower. As a result, Yvette is more likely to pick up those second preferences.

Stats from the Yvette For Labour team show Yvette picking up the majority of second preferences from all candidates – from the Progress wing supporting Liz to the softer left fans of Jeremy – and Andy's supporters too. Their figures show many undecideds opting for Yvette as their first preference, as well as others choosing to switch their first preference to Yvette from one of the other candidates. It's for this reason I still believe only Yvette has the breadth of support to beat Jeremy and then to go on to win in 2020.

It's interesting that Andy has not been willing to make it clear that second preferences should go to Yvette or Liz. Yvette has been very clear that she would encourage second preferences to be for Andy or Liz.

Having watched Andy on Sky's Murnaghan show this morning, he categorically states that Labour will not get beyond first base with the electorate at a general election if we are not economically credible and that fundamentally Jeremy's economic plans do not add up. So, I am unsure why Andy is so unwilling to be clear on second preferences.

All the recent polling suggests Andy is losing more votes than anyone else to Jeremy. He trails fourth in London – where a huge proportion of our electorate is based.

So I would urge Tom to reflect more widely on who is best placed to provide the strongest opposition to the Tories, appeal to the widest group of voters and reach out to the communities we need to win back. I believe that this has to be Yvette.

The Newsnight focus group a few days ago showed that Yvette is best placed to win back those former Labour voters we will need in 2020.

Labour will pay a massive price if we ignore this.

Diana Johnson is the Labour MP for Hull North.