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CommentPlus: pick of the papers

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Any Lib-Con team can't last. But it would be fun to watch (Guardian)

The Spectator editor, Fraser Nelson, says that while Nick Clegg's principles are flexible enough for the Tories, an alliance would spell disaster and a new election within a year.

2. Nick Clegg the kingmaker (Daily Telegraph)

Clegg's denial that he could decide the outcome of the next election is disingenuous, says Andrew Gimson, discussing the Liberal Democrat leader's speech to conference in Birmingham yesterday.

3. Don't be sniffy about personality politics (Times)

William Rees-Mogg looks at the election campaign, saying that in an age of complicated technical issues, voters are wise to set great store by a party leader's character.

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4. A frugal policy is the better solution (Financial Times)

The Tory shadow chancellor, George Osborne, and Jeffrey Sachs respond to the economists Paul Krugman, Richard Layard and Robert Skidelsky, arguing that the recovery of the financial system depends on a credible plan to re-establish sound public finances.

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5. Black presidents and women MPs do not alone mean equality and justice (Guardian)

Representation is a start, and an important one, says Gary Younge, but equal opportunities should be pursued above the photo opportunities.

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6. A welcome attempt to bring clarity to the debate on rape (Independent)

The leading article praises Baroness Stern's report for highlighting the dangers of over-reliance on conviction rates.

7. Goodbye to the bishops (Guardian)

Polly Toynbee argues that the failure to reform the House of Lords was a missed opportunity for Labour. The Lords is for people of all faiths and none: there is no space for reserved benches for the clergy.

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8. We climate scientists are not ecofanatics (Times)

If the IPCC has a fault, writes Sir John Houghton, it is that its reports have been too cautious, not alarmist. Scientists have facts on their side and must not be afraid to deploy them.

9. This lunacy about Latin makes me want to weep with rage (Daily Telegraph)

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, mounts an impassioned defence of the teaching of Latin, saying that to abolish it in state schools is evidence of elitism on the part of the Schools Secretary, Ed Balls.

10. Obama has failed to bring peace to the Middle East (Independent)

When it comes to peace terms, most Israelis are wholly unrealistic, says Bruce Anderson; they want to yoke the Palestinians at the cost of national humiliation. Both sides want peace, and this is Israel's best hope for a danger-free future.

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