Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Keep plugging away. The brand is a winner (Times)

The Tories think that the job of changing their party's image is complete, says Daniel Finkelstein. It isn't -- they must continue to reinforce their new brand. Complacency could be fatal.

2. The Innocent smoothies of politics are still the party of the rich (Guardian)

Jonathan Freedland agrees that the Conservative Party rebranding was an early success. But, he says, the Michael Ashcroft tax scandal plays into the public's expectations of the party -- the new Tory brand can't survive many more ugly revelations.

3. Charisma can only go so far for Cameron (Financial Times)

All the charisma in the world can't sort out the contradictions in the new Conservative message, says Matthew Engel. At the end of the day, politics is about beef as well as beefcake.

4. An appeal to the better nature of the baby boomers -- and Boris Johnson (Daily Telegraph)

The Tory front-bencher David Willetts responds to the Mayor of London's column in Monday's Telegraph, which challenged the argument of his new book. Willetts reaffirms that the contract between the generations is broken.

5. Belfast: this deal is a big deal (Guardian)

Devolution completes the Northern Irish jigsaw, but, says Denis Murray, in two years no one will remember that it was an issue. The DUP's main problem now is the formation of an ultra-traditionalist party that will split the unionist vote three ways.

6. Don't write off the US economy (Independent)

China and India may be growing much faster, says Hamish McRae, but in technical innovation there's no contest: the rest of the world looks to the United States for innovation.

7. Where have all the female firebrands gone? (Times)

In 1997 a record number of women MPs got into parliament, says Suzy Jagger. But their biggest achievement was getting elected -- women are not making heavyweight policy on the front benches, or causing trouble from the back benches.

8. Straw has left justice to the tender mercies of the press (Guardian)

The chief enemy of British freedom today is the British press, according to Simon Jenkins. Under the banner of transparency, ministers have allowed a frenzy of blame to develop around the Jon Venables case. This is a decline from the rule of law back towards the lynch mob.

9. Europe must confront its real economic problems (Independent)

Blaming speculators for the eurozone's woes is a displacement activity, says the leading article. Europe needs fundamental reforms to its labour markets and a big shift in internal demand.

10. Rob rich bankers and give money to the poor (Times)

Jeffrey Sachs makes the case for a Robin Hood tax on financial transactions; after all, Wall Street and the City did so little to deserve their record profits.

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A dozen defeated parliamentary candidates back Caroline Flint for deputy

Supporters of all the leadership candidates have rallied around Caroline Flint's bid to be deputy leader.

Twelve former parliamentary candidates have backed Caroline Flint's bid to become deputy leader in an open letter to the New Statesman. Dubbing the Don Valley MP a "fantastic campaigner", they explain that why despite backing different candidates for the leadership, they "are united in supporting Caroline Flint to be Labour's next deputy leader", who they describe as a "brilliant communicator and creative policy maker". 

Flint welcomed the endorsement, saying: "our candidates know better than most what it takes to win the sort of seats Labour must gain in order to win a general election, so I'm delighted to have their support.". She urged Labour to rebuild "not by lookin to the past, but by learning from the past", saying that "we must rediscover Labour's voice, especially in communities wher we do not have a Labour MP:".

The Flint campaign will hope that the endorsement provides a boost as the campaign enters its final days.

The full letter is below:

There is no route to Downing Street that does not run through the seats we fought for Labour at the General Election.

"We need a new leadership team that can win back Labour's lost voters.

Although we are backing different candidates to be Leader, we are united in supporting Caroline Flint to be Labour's next deputy leader.

Not only is Caroline a fantastic campaigner, who toured the country supporting Labour's candidates, she's also a brilliant communicator and creative policy maker, which is exactly what we need in our next deputy leader.

If Labour is to win the next election, it is vital that we pick a leadership team that doesn't just appeal to Labour Party members, but is capable of winning the General Election. Caroline Flint is our best hope of beating the Tories.

We urge Labour Party members and supporters to unite behind Caroline Flint and begin the process of rebuilding to win in 2020.

Jessica Asato (Norwich North), Will Straw (Rossendale and Darween), Nick Bent (Warrington South), Mike Le Surf (South Basildon and East Thurrock), Tris Osborne (Chatham and Aylesford), Victoria Groulef (Reading West), Jamie Hanley (Pudsey), Kevin McKeever (Northampton South), Joy Squires (Worcester), Paul Clark (Gillingham and Rainham), Patrick Hall (Bedford) and Mary Wimbury (Aberconwy)

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.