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Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from the Sunday papers.

1. Don't laugh at Europe's woes. The travails facing Greece are also ours (Observer)

Will Hutton warns that all of Europe, including the UK, will suffer if the struggle to reform Greece and to make the euro work is lost. As long as Britain owns a fifth of Greek bonds, it cannot stand on the sidelines.

2. We can be safe without torturing (Sunday Times)

Torture may sometimes work but it is always morally wrong, argues Martin Ivens. Nonetheless, it is no longer acceptable for us to offer terrorist suspects asylum in this country.

3. Why master juggler Cameron is suddenly dropping the balls (Observer)

Andrew Rawnsley afgues that David Cameron is short of two qualities essential for a leader: a clear sense of purpose and a committed body of followers. He has failed to resolve the underlying tensions in the Conservative Party.

4. Touchy-feely catchy voter (Independent on Sunday)

We should give Gordon Brown credit for deciding he can do the "touchy-feely stuff" after all, says John Rentoul about Brown's TV interview with Piers Morgan.

5. Gordon Brown deserves our sympathy, not our vote (Sunday Telegraph)

But Matthew d'Ancona argues that although viewers will sympathise with Brown, their overall opinion of him will not change. For 13 years they have watched him intimidate his foes and destroy those who stand in his way.

6. The north is not history -- but it badly needs a new chapter (Independent on Sunday)

The world of EastEnders, 25 years old this week, is thriving but northernness is in decline, writes Andrew Martin. The BBC and any incoming government must assist its revival.

7. The hidden battle for parliament's soul (Observer)

Henry Porter says that MPs' struggle to repeal Standing Order 14, which allows the executive control over parliamentary business, is one of the most important moments for democracy in the past five years.

8. Where's the risk in Mrs Cable's tapestry needle? (Mail on Sunday)

The control freakery of the state and the futile pursuit of zero risk must end, writes Vince Cable.

9. Maybe this is the end of the beginning (Sunday Times)

A leading article in the Sunday Times argues that the military surge under way in Afghanistan is a bold and necessary move. If it succeeds, it could mark the beginning of the end of the insurgency and the start of Afghan autonomy.

10. The "Eye" has it -- the rest of us wish we had (Independent on Sunday)

The remarkable success of Private Eye, which has just recorded its highest circulation since 1992, reminds the rest of the media not to take themselves too seriously, writes Sarah Sands.

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