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Morning call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from the Sunday papers.

1. The Tories have the answers, but not the strength to deliver (Observer)

David Cameron and George Osborne are creating a new Tory philosophy, says Will Hutton, without drawing on any great thinker. They are doing some things right, but are ultimately unconvincing.

2. A jittery January -- but the Tories need some perspective (Sunday Telegraph)

Meanwhile, Matthew d'Ancona looks at the problems in the Conservative camp from the right, arguing that although the Cameron team's nerves are easy to explain, they need to take a reality check.

3. U-turn if you want to -- they certainly do (Sunday Times)

Martin Ivens says that both Labour and the Tories are engaging in frequent U-turns. Cameron must show a firm political purpose that can withstand events.

4. Cameron, the Houdini of Westminster (Independent on Sunday)

John Rentoul weighs into the debate, too, saying that it looks like Cameron is shackled by a falling poll lead, policy muddles and photoshopped posters, but in reality he is still poised to glide into power.

5. Parliament is finally cleaning up its act? Don't count on it (Observer)

Optimists in politics hope that public trust can be regained, says Andrew Rawnsley. But it'll take more than a few MPs in the dock and an election.

6. MPs' expenses: Our MPs still aren't getting the message (Sunday Telegraph)

The editorial argues that the Rotten Parliament, as future historians may know it, must be replaced by one whose ethos is different from those of its predecessors.

7. The sisterhood is costing us our jobs (Sunday Times)

Eleanor Mills argues that working mothers want very different things, and it is women who suffer from a law that forbids employers to ask them about their intentions.

8. Sceptics have their uses (Independent on Sunday)

Taking an unexpected stance, the leading article says that climate-change sceptics have done us all a favour -- their challenges have tested the flabbier assumptions of that consensus and forced proponents of the majority view to sharpen their arguments.

9. Libel tourists will love the tales of Lord Hoffmann (Observer)

Nick Cohen bemoans the hypocrisy of England's libel courts, saying that judges are now using slogans coined by the left.

10. Anti-Semitism is at the limits of irony (Independent on Sunday)

Racism against Jews is on the rise, writes Anne Karpf, but some of it masquerades as comedy, and that makes it complex and difficult to address.


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