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Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers

1. A Greek crisis is coming to America (Financial Times)

Niall Ferguson writes that Greece's troubles are indicative of the wider fiscal crisis in the western world. The difficulty will soon spread to Britain and, most dangerously, to the US.

2. Greek tragedy won't end in the euro's death (Times)

Elsewhere, Anatole Kaletsky says that all the conditions are in place for an EU bailout of Greece, but southern Europe's economies are likely to suffer for years.

3. The tide has turned, and the Tories are swimming against it (Independent)

Steve Richards predicts that a Conservative government will struggle to reverse the shift away from market economics.

4. One in five could actually be a winning endorsement (Guardian)

John Harris warns that at the next election, with turnout falling below 50 per cent, a party with the support of less than 20 per cent of the electorate is likely to take office.

5. To win, Cameron must convince the public to trust politicians again (Daily Telegraph)

To earn trust in the post-expenses age, David Cameron must avoid headline-grabbing gimmicks, says Benedict Brogan.

6. The sight of Ukraine's lumpen victor should stir the EU's own into action (Guardian)

Timothy Garton Ash argues that the election of Viktor Yanukovich as Ukraine's president may show that the country is becoming a serious democracy.

7. Where war goes, propaganda follows (Independent)

Government manipulation of the news has become easier since insurgents started targeting journalists, writes Patrick Cockburn.

8. We must not ignore human rights in Iran (Financial Times)

The west should focus on challenging Iran's human rights record rather than imposing new sanctions, argues Trita Parsi.

9. Amnesty shouldn't support men like Moazzam Begg (Independent)

Joan Smith says that Amnesty International must not allow its name to be used to lend legitimacy to those who oppose human rights.

10. The army cannot carry its wounded for ever (Times)

Doug Beattie writes that the British army can no longer be expected to care for seriously injured troops. We must do more to prepare soldiers for civilian life.

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