Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers

1. A Greek crisis is coming to America (Financial Times)

Niall Ferguson writes that Greece's troubles are indicative of the wider fiscal crisis in the western world. The difficulty will soon spread to Britain and, most dangerously, to the US.

2. Greek tragedy won't end in the euro's death (Times)

Elsewhere, Anatole Kaletsky says that all the conditions are in place for an EU bailout of Greece, but southern Europe's economies are likely to suffer for years.

3. The tide has turned, and the Tories are swimming against it (Independent)

Steve Richards predicts that a Conservative government will struggle to reverse the shift away from market economics.

4. One in five could actually be a winning endorsement (Guardian)

John Harris warns that at the next election, with turnout falling below 50 per cent, a party with the support of less than 20 per cent of the electorate is likely to take office.

5. To win, Cameron must convince the public to trust politicians again (Daily Telegraph)

To earn trust in the post-expenses age, David Cameron must avoid headline-grabbing gimmicks, says Benedict Brogan.

6. The sight of Ukraine's lumpen victor should stir the EU's own into action (Guardian)

Timothy Garton Ash argues that the election of Viktor Yanukovich as Ukraine's president may show that the country is becoming a serious democracy.

7. Where war goes, propaganda follows (Independent)

Government manipulation of the news has become easier since insurgents started targeting journalists, writes Patrick Cockburn.

8. We must not ignore human rights in Iran (Financial Times)

The west should focus on challenging Iran's human rights record rather than imposing new sanctions, argues Trita Parsi.

9. Amnesty shouldn't support men like Moazzam Begg (Independent)

Joan Smith says that Amnesty International must not allow its name to be used to lend legitimacy to those who oppose human rights.

10. The army cannot carry its wounded for ever (Times)

Doug Beattie writes that the British army can no longer be expected to care for seriously injured troops. We must do more to prepare soldiers for civilian life.

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PMQs review: Theresa May shows how her confidence has grown

After her Brexit speech, the PM declared of Jeremy Corbyn: "I've got a plan - he doesn't have a clue". 

The woman derided as “Theresa Maybe” believes she has neutralised that charge. Following her Brexit speech, Theresa May cut a far more confident figure at today's PMQs. Jeremy Corbyn inevitably devoted all six of his questions to Europe but failed to land a definitive blow.

He began by denouncing May for “sidelining parliament” at the very moment the UK was supposedly reclaiming sovereignty (though he yesterday praised her for guaranteeing MPs would get a vote). “It’s not so much the Iron Lady as the irony lady,” he quipped. But May, who has sometimes faltered against Corbyn, had a ready retort. The Labour leader, she noted, had denounced the government for planning to leave the single market while simultaneously seeking “access” to it. Yet “access”, she went on, was precisely what Corbyn had demanded (seemingly having confused it with full membership). "I've got a plan - he doesn't have a clue,” she declared.

When Corbyn recalled May’s economic warnings during the referendum (“Does she now disagree with herself?”), the PM was able to reply: “I said if we voted to leave the EU the sky would not fall in and look at what has happened to our economic situation since we voted to leave the EU”.

Corbyn’s subsequent question on whether May would pay for single market access was less wounding than it might have been because she has consistently refused to rule out budget contributions (though yesterday emphasised that the days of “vast” payments were over).

When the Labour leader ended by rightly hailing the contribution immigrants made to public services (“The real pressure on public services comes from a government that slashed billions”), May took full opportunity of the chance to have the last word, launching a full-frontal attack on his leadership and a defence of hers. “There is indeed a difference - when I look at the issue of Brexit or any other issues like the NHS or social care, I consider the issue, I set out my plan and I stick to it. It's called leadership, he should try it some time.”

For May, life will soon get harder. Once Article 50 is triggered, it is the EU 27, not the UK, that will take back control (the withdrawal agreement must be approved by at least 72 per cent of member states). With MPs now guaranteed a vote on the final outcome, parliament will also reassert itself. But for now, May can reflect with satisfaction on her strengthened position.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.