Web Only: the best of the blogs

The five must-read posts from today, on Eton, voter turnout and gay rights.

1. David Cameron's Eton schooldays

Paul Waugh reports on a new book, out next month, that gives a fictitious account of the Tory leader's days at school.

2. The great turnout quandary

Turnout will rise to between 65 and 70 per cent at the next election, predicts PoliticalBetting's Mike Smithson.

3. The Oscars adopt the Alternative Vote

At Next Left, Sunder Katwala blogs on electoral reform . . . at the Oscars.

4. James Purnell's confusion on markets

Liberal Conspiracy's Chris Dillow argues that Purnell's belief that politicans can intervene both to override markets and to build new ones is naive.

5. Gay rights -- what will you believe: the Tory spin or the Tory voting record?

Stephen Tall at Liberal Democrat Voice looks at the Conservatives' voting record on gay issues, and questions whether they will seriously advance gay equality if they come into power.

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To stop Jeremy Corbyn, I am giving my second preference to Andy Burnham

The big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Voting is now underway in the Labour leadership election. There can be no doubt that Jeremy Corbyn is the frontrunner, but the race isn't over yet.

I know from conversations across the country that many voters still haven't made up their mind.

Some are drawn to Jeremy's promises of a new Jerusalem and endless spending, but worried that these endless promises, with no credibility, will only serve to lose us the next general election.

Others are certain that a Jeremy victory is really a win for Cameron and Osborne, but don't know who is the best alternative to vote for.

I am supporting Liz Kendall and will give her my first preference. But polling data is brutally clear: the big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Andy can win. He can draw together support from across the party, motivated by his history of loyalty to the Labour movement, his passionate appeal for unity in fighting the Tories, and the findings of every poll of the general public in this campaign that he is best placed candidate to win the next general election.

Yvette, in contrast, would lose to Jeremy Corbyn and lose heavily. Evidence from data collected by all the campaigns – except (apparently) Yvette's own – shows this. All publicly available polling shows the same. If Andy drops out of the race, a large part of the broad coalition he attracts will vote for Jeremy. If Yvette is knocked out, her support firmly swings behind Andy.

We will all have our views about the different candidates, but the real choice for our country is between a Labour government and the ongoing rightwing agenda of the Tories.

I am in politics to make a real difference to the lives of my constituents. We are all in the Labour movement to get behind the beliefs that unite all in our party.

In the crucial choice we are making right now, I have no doubt that a vote for Jeremy would be the wrong choice – throwing away the next election, and with it hope for the next decade.

A vote for Yvette gets the same result – her defeat by Jeremy, and Jeremy's defeat to Cameron and Osborne.

In the crucial choice between Yvette and Andy, Andy will get my second preference so we can have the best hope of keeping the fight for our party alive, and the best hope for the future of our country too.

Tom Blenkinsop is the Labour MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland