Morning Call: pick of the comment:

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. There's real hope from Haiti and it's not what you expect (Independent)

Johann Hari writes that the good news from Haiti is that the IMF backed down and agreed to work to cancel the country's entire debt. This is the first sign that exposing and opposing the body's agenda works.

2. Between the bomb and the barricades (Financial Times)

It's a relief that Iran's uranium centrifuges keep breaking down, says Philip Stephens. No one in the west knows how to punish Iran for its nuclear programme without playing into the hands of the regime.

3. My heart refuses to race to this cross-Channel love-in (Guardian)

Martin Kettle argues that while logic supports an Anglo-French defence partnership, a combination of cultural mistrust and divergent national interests means it isn't going to happen.

4. 1997 revisited (Economist)

The Economist's Bagehot writes that Gordon Brown's deathbed conversion to electoral reform reflects his nostalgia for 1997. It is an attempt to turn back the clock -- to a time when Labour seemed capable of being a force for change

5. The smell from Westminster hasn't gone away (Times)

Martin Bell writes that although most of the worst offenders of the expenses scandal will be gone after the next election, it is vital that voters watch the class of 2010 with an eagle eye.

6. The public sector could save the economy -- if only politicians let it (Daily Telegraph)

Andrew Haldenby claims that public-sector managers know that spending can be cut by 20 per cent without harming actual services; it's just the government that is holding them back.

7. The market has failed over bankers' pay (Times)

The City minister, Paul Myners, argues that it's time for fund managers to come out of the shadows. They have invited public scrutiny of their failures.

8. Scientists, you are fallible. Get off the pedestal and join the common herd (Guardian)

Simon Jenkins says that climate scientists need to rediscover the virtue of self-criticism -- or others will continue to question their evidence.

9. Stench that will linger long after stables are swept (Independent)

Andrew Grice predicts that the expenses scandal will play a prominent role at the general election, not least because candidates are bound to milk it at local level.

10. Britain has been hit harder than you think (Financial Times)

Samuel Brittan argues that anyone who bases their vote on the latest GDP figures should be disenfranchised. These initial estimates are not exact enough even to say where in a range of plus or minus 1 per cent the change occurred.

 

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This is no time for a coup against a successful Labour leader

Don't blame Jeremy Corbyn for the Labour Party's crisis.

"The people who are sovereign in our party are the members," said John McDonnell this morning. As the coup against Jeremy Corbyn gains pace, the Shadow Chancellor has been talking a lot of sense. "It is time for people to come together to work in the interest of the country," he told Peston on Sunday, while emphasising that people will quickly lose trust in politics altogether if this internal squabbling continues. 

The Tory party is in complete disarray. Just days ago, the first Tory leader in 23 years to win a majority for his party was forced to resign from Government after just over a year in charge. We have some form of caretaker Government. Those who led the Brexit campaign now have no idea what to do. 

It is disappointing that a handful of Labour parliamentarians have decided to join in with the disintegration of British politics.

The Labour Party had the opportunity to keep its head while all about it lost theirs. It could have positioned itself as a credible alternative to a broken Government and a Tory party in chaos. Instead we have been left with a pathetic attempt to overturn the democratic will of the membership. 

But this has been coming for some time. In my opinion it has very little to do with the ramifications of the referendum result. Jeremy Corbyn was asked to do two things throughout the campaign: first, get Labour voters to side with Remain, and second, get young people to do the same.

Nearly seven in ten Labour supporters backed Remain. Young voters supported Remain by a 4:1 margin. This is about much more than an allegedly half-hearted referendum performance.

The Parliamentary Labour Party has failed to come to terms with Jeremy Corbyn’s emphatic victory. In September of last year he was elected with 59.5 per cent of the vote, some 170,000 ahead of his closest rival. It is a fact worth repeating. If another Labour leadership election were to be called I would expect Jeremy Corbyn to win by a similar margin.

In the recent local elections Jeremy managed to increase Labour’s share of the national vote on the 2015 general election. They said he would lose every by-election. He has won them emphatically. Time and time again Jeremy has exceeded expectation while also having to deal with an embittered wing within his own party.

This is no time for a leadership coup. I am dumbfounded by the attempt to remove Jeremy. The only thing that will come out of this attempted coup is another leadership election that Jeremy will win. Those opposed to him will then find themselves back at square one. Such moves only hurt Labour’s electoral chances. Labour could be offering an ambitious plan to the country concerning our current relationship with Europe, if opponents of Jeremy Corbyn hadn't decided to drop a nuke on the party.

This is a crisis Jeremy should take no responsibility for. The "bitterites" will try and they will fail. Corbyn may face a crisis of confidence. But it's the handful of rebel Labour MPs that have forced the party into a crisis of existence.

Liam Young is a commentator for the IndependentNew Statesman, Mirror and others.