The New Statesman’s rolling politics blog

RSS

Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers

1. Lessons from Chilcot on the Atlantic alliance (Financial Times)

Max Hastings says the Chilcot inquiry has confirmed that the Atlantic alliance was the central cause of Britain's involvement in the Iraq war. But the two main parties still prefer subservience to Washington to the uncertainties of a lonely freedom.

2. Jack Straw demonstrates the flaws of the principled political careerist (Guardian)

In putting the survival of the government above any single cause, Jack Straw has allowed many policy wrongs to take place, says Julian Glover.

3. A pact with France will keep us fighting fit (Times)

Malcolm Rifkind argues that in order to remain a global power, the UK must engage in serious defence co-operation with France. A new entente cordiale is required 100 years after the declaration of the last one.

4. Here lies New Labour -- the party that died in Iraq (Guardian)

Jackie Ashley says that Iraq destroyed progressive politics in Britain for a generation. In disgust at Blair's war, countless numbers of people lost heart and turned away from public life.

5. Which capitalism? (Times)

A leader in the Times says that the World Economic Forum in Davos proved that the critical divide is no longer between capitalism and socialism, but between the liberal capitalism promoted by the west and the authoritarian capitalism favoured by the east.

6. Into economy class, Mandy, and bring your spendthrift chums, too (Daily Telegraph)

Boris Johnson writes about a plane journey in which he sat in economy while Lord Mandelson reclined in first class. Such taxpayer-funded perks should be abolished, he says. The servants of the people should travel with the people.

7. How the British empire is striking back (Independent)

The Chilcot inquiry has shown itself to be imperialist by failing to invite a single Iraqi to testify, argues Yasmin Alibhai-Brown. It should have called in some of the exiled Kurds and Iraqis who backed Bush and Blair, and should have questioned them about the advice they gave.

8. What the eurozone must do if it is to survive (Financial Times)

The eurozone is entering the most dangerous phase in its 11-year history, warns Wolfgang Münchau. If it is to survive, EU leaders must find greater political will.

9. No relief for the Palestinians while Israel enjoys impunity (Independent)

The west should consider imposing cultural and economic sanctions on Israel, argues Andrew Phillips. Nothing else has worked and time may be short.

10. Beijing raises its voice (Guardian)

Martin Jacques says that China's fierce protest over US arms sales to Taiwan reflects the migration of power from west to east.

 

Follow the New Statesman team on Twitter.