Iran: power and the people

To accompany this week's Iran special, we look at the country from two angles -- the power and the p

Amid claims that the US secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, is trying to "drive a wedge" between the Revolutionary Guard and the Iranian people, we suggest that the picture is far more complicated than this simple split.

First, we break down the power groups in the Islamic Republic and try to answer the simple question: Who rules Iran? Hillary Clinton this week said that "Iran is moving towards a military dictatorship", a claim rebuffed by Iran's foreign minister, Manouchehr Mottaki. We take a look at the power relationships that inform Iranian politics.

Second, we look at the composition of Iranian society. In the wake of recent demonstrations, many articles in the western press have referred to "the Iranian people" and "Iranian society". Here we identify the heterogeneous groups among the 74 million people who inhabit Iran and the socio-economic situations in which they live.

The future of Iran, from the reform movement to the country's nuclear programme, will be played out in relationships between the power and the people. The international community would do well to take these relationships into account.

Getty
Show Hide image

Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

0800 7318496