Iran: power and the people

To accompany this week's Iran special, we look at the country from two angles -- the power and the p

Amid claims that the US secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, is trying to "drive a wedge" between the Revolutionary Guard and the Iranian people, we suggest that the picture is far more complicated than this simple split.

First, we break down the power groups in the Islamic Republic and try to answer the simple question: Who rules Iran? Hillary Clinton this week said that "Iran is moving towards a military dictatorship", a claim rebuffed by Iran's foreign minister, Manouchehr Mottaki. We take a look at the power relationships that inform Iranian politics.

Second, we look at the composition of Iranian society. In the wake of recent demonstrations, many articles in the western press have referred to "the Iranian people" and "Iranian society". Here we identify the heterogeneous groups among the 74 million people who inhabit Iran and the socio-economic situations in which they live.

The future of Iran, from the reform movement to the country's nuclear programme, will be played out in relationships between the power and the people. The international community would do well to take these relationships into account.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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