Why are we letting these "kidnappers" off so lightly?

The media have been sympathetic to the US missionaries awaiting trial in Haiti.

The plight of the American missionaries awaiting trial in Haiti for kidnapping children has been reported pretty sympathetically so far -- even though 22 of the 33 children they tried to take across the border into the Dominican Republic have parents, which is stretching the definition of "orphan" beyond even the one in the dictionary Madonna evidently consults.

On the Telegraph website, Toby Young has posted a short article titled "No good deed goes unpunished" (you get the gist). And even though Toby is a professional provocateur (I attach no opprobrium to the label, by the way), I suspect many Telegraph readers will agree with him, even if some of those commenting on the thread have not.

The overall impression given has been of kindly, God-fearing folk, a little naive -- golly gee, do you have to have documents to take kids that aren't even yours across international frontiers? -- but, in the main, just out to do good.

Imagine, however, as Jon Snow suggested at a Three Faiths Forum talk I attended last week, if a group of Muslims had been discovered doing the taking. There would have been an uproar, he observed.

So why have we let these Southern Baptists, the "Idaho Ten", as they're already being called, off so lightly? I'm afraid the answers are as obvious as they are unpalatable.

Follow the New Statesman team on Twitter.

Sholto Byrnes is a Contributing Editor to the New Statesman
New Statesman
Show Hide image

Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.