Web Only: the best of the blogs

The five must-read blogs from today, on Miliband, Tory co-ops and Muslim Trots.

1. Is Miliband being a bit premature about the leadership?

David Miliband's reported plan to tour the country in an effort to build support for a leadership bid is highly dangerous, argues PoliticalBetting's Mike Smithson.

2. Will Tory co-ops take off?

Conservative co-operatives are a bold idea that few workers will want to take up in practice, writes the FT's Alex Barker.

3. The Tories don't understand co-op values

Elsewhere, in a guest post at LabourList, Tessa Jowell argues that the failure of the Conservative Co-operative movement proves that the Tories have no idea what co-operative values mean.

4. My response to Fraser Nelson

Daniel Finkelstein says the Spectator editor underestimates how politically and technically difficult it would be would be for the Tories to carry out major spending cuts. "The party is not the paramilitary wing of an op-ed column," he writes.

5. Hizb ut-Tahrir and "Muslim Trots": reply to Ed Husain

Dave Osler responds to Ed Husain's New Statesman article and rejects his comparison between Islamism and Trotskyism.

 

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.