Web Only: the best of the blogs

The five must-read posts from today, on MPs' lobbying links, social networking and US health care.

1. Why holding the Iraq inquiry is not a political mistake

Next Left's Sunder Katwala challenges the conventional wisdom that the Iraq inquiry has backfired on Gordon Brown.

2. Voodoo corner

UK Polling Report's Anthony Wells warns of the rise of "voodoo polls" -- open-access polls that do not make any attempt to gather a representative sample. Today's Mumsnet poll on voting intentions is a typical offender, he says.

3. MPs' lobbying links to be revealed

The Times's Sam Coates says it's worth keeping an eye on a list revealing the identities of the lobbyists for whom MPs have hired rooms.

4. Social media's impact on politics, part one: the groups that face extinction

Mark Pack at Liberal Democrat Voice discusses the "real impact" of social networking sites on politics.

5. Did Obama move health care forward?

The New York Times's Room for Debate blog has a rolling discussion of the health-care overhaul -- where will it go from here, if anywhere? Harold Pollack, Steffie Woolhandler and David Himmelstein have contributed so far.

 

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.