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The five must-read posts from today, on the election date, Rod Liddle and Vince Cable

1. Bob Ainsworth doesn't reveal election decision

Over at Comment Central, Daniel Finkelstein says the Defence Secretary hasn't given away the date of the election; he was making an educated guess, like the rest of us. The only person who knows when the election will be is Gordon Brown.

2. The politics of evil

Hopi Sen argues that the problem with David Cameron's speech on the Edlington case was not the purpose, but the content. A speech that promised to answer some "pretty deep questions" turned out to be a laundry list of existing Tory policies.

3. Indie journos send coded messages to Rod Liddle

Liberal Conspiracy's Sunny Hundal suggests that a favourable article in the Independent on Mary Seacole, the celebrated black Victorian nurse, was intended to be a wind-up to Rod Liddle, potential Indie editor.

4. Tony Blair to receive £££ from Tory hedge fund

The FT's Westminster blog reports that Blair is to become a paid speaker on foreign policy for Lansdowne Partners. And it points out that Paul Ruddock, co-founder of this hedge fund, is a prominent Tory donor.

5. Cable sets out economic vision, but tax policy could be more "radical"

Vince Cable admits that the Lib Dems' tax cut plans aren't as redistributive as tax credits, reports Left Foot Forward.

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Police shoot man in parliament

A man carrying what appeared to be a knife was shot by armed police after entering the parliamentary estate. 

From the window of the parliamentary Press Gallery, I have just seen police shoot a man who charged at officers while carrying what appeared to be a knife. A large crowd was seen fleeing from the man before he entered the parliamentary estate.

After several officers evaded him he was swiftly shot by armed police.

Ministers have been evacuated and journalists ordered to remain at their desks. 

More follows. Read Julia Rampen's news story here.

Armed police at the cordon outside Parliament on Wednesday afternoon. Photo: Getty

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.