Tebbit's daring blog debut

Tory peer praises Brown and attacks Cameron

A warm welcome to Norman Tebbit, who has just started blogging at the Telegraph. Tebbit's blog is likely to make uncomfortable reading for Conservative Central Office, and the Chingford skinhead takes just 118 words to launch a thinly veiled attack on David Cameron.

He writes:

Grittiness and the stiff upper lip seem to have been replaced with emotional incontinence, political correctness and open-necked shirts worn with well-cut suits.

And his contempt for Cameron (one feels he can't bear to mention him by name) is deliberately contrasted with his admiration for Gordon Brown. Of the Prime Minister, he says:

About the only leading politican to show any [grit] these days seems to be the much-abused Prime Minister Brown.

Like other conservatives (Rupert Murdoch and Paul Dacre among them), Tebbit respects and admires Brown for his intellect, his work ethic and his Presbyterian conscience.

Tebbit's appreciation for Brown is well established, but perhaps more surprising is his praise for Clement Attlee, the man who vanquished the Tory party in 1945 and oversaw the nationalisation of one-fifth of the economy.

Of Attlee, he laments: "Would that we had a leader of any party to compare with him."

Tebbit's political views still make me shudder, but if his blog continues to be this contrarian and independent-minded it's well worth bookmarking, I'd say.

 

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Who will win the Copeland by-election?

Labour face a tricky task in holding onto the seat. 

What’s the Copeland by-election about? That’s the question that will decide who wins it.

The Conservatives want it to be about the nuclear industry, which is the seat’s biggest employer, and Jeremy Corbyn’s long history of opposition to nuclear power.

Labour want it to be about the difficulties of the NHS in Cumbria in general and the future of West Cumberland Hospital in particular.

Who’s winning? Neither party is confident of victory but both sides think it will be close. That Theresa May has visited is a sign of the confidence in Conservative headquarters that, win or lose, Labour will not increase its majority from the six-point lead it held over the Conservatives in May 2015. (It’s always more instructive to talk about vote share rather than raw numbers, in by-elections in particular.)

But her visit may have been counterproductive. Yes, she is the most popular politician in Britain according to all the polls, but in visiting she has added fuel to the fire of Labour’s message that the Conservatives are keeping an anxious eye on the outcome.

Labour strategists feared that “the oxygen” would come out of the campaign if May used her visit to offer a guarantee about West Cumberland Hospital. Instead, she refused to answer, merely hyping up the issue further.

The party is nervous that opposition to Corbyn is going to supress turnout among their voters, but on the Conservative side, there is considerable irritation that May’s visit has made their task harder, too.

Voters know the difference between a by-election and a general election and my hunch is that people will get they can have a free hit on the health question without risking the future of the nuclear factory. That Corbyn has U-Turned on nuclear power only helps.

I said last week that if I knew what the local paper would look like between now and then I would be able to call the outcome. Today the West Cumbria News & Star leads with Downing Street’s refusal to answer questions about West Cumberland Hospital. All the signs favour Labour. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.