Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from the Sunday papers

1. Britain's dirty secret: class still matters (Sunday Times)

Jenni Russell argues that neither of the two main parties is being honest about what is needed to improve class mobility. Labour fails to look closely enough at behaviour and character, while the Tories refuse to confront the realities of structural privilege.

2. Why Ulster should celebrate its sex and money scandal (Observer)

Andrew Rawnsley says that the Iris Robinson scandal demonstrates that the politics of Northern Ireland, abnormal for so long, are becoming a little bit more like everywhere else's. Sex and money scandals are the stuff of ordinary politics the world over.

3. How many years out in the cold? (Independent on Sunday)

John Rentoul says there are hopeful signs that Labour will not fall into open warfare if defeated at the next election. Jon Cruddas, a thoughtful and unifying figure, is said to be open to running as David Miliband's deputy.

4. There's no shame in hiring a pariah (Observer)

By hiring Sir Fred Goodwin as a senior adviser, the international architecture firm RMJM has recognised the talent beneath the tarnish, says Heather McGregor.

5. The world expects the US to do its duty (Independent on Sunday)

Barack Obama has responded well to the Haitian crisis but he must now ensure that more aid gets through, says James Moore.

6. Forget it -- Blair will never be branded a war criminal (Observer)

Nick Cohen argues that opponents of the Iraq war are still unable to substantiate their claim that the 2003 invasion was "illegal". The Ba'athist regime was not entitled to treat the country as its private prison.

7. Gordon Brown's election strategy is doomed, but you have to admire the cheek of it (Sunday Telegraph)

Matthew d'Ancona predicts that Brown's attempt to present himself as the champion of the middle classes will backfire.

8. Be afraid, China, the Google dragon stirs (Sunday Times)

Dominic Lawson says that when civilisations clash, there is generally only one winner. Despite its genius for repression, the Chinese Communist Party will be beaten by Google.

9. Our troops need aid too (News of the World)

Fraser Nelson argues that, with Britain at war, David Cameron should give priority to the defence budget over international development.

10. Say what you like, as long as it meets with the mob's approval (Observer)

Catherine Bennett says that, following the rise of the Twitter mob, the privilege of free expression carries with it a grave responsibility: not to say anything that people might not like.

 

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PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn bids for the NHS to rescue Labour

Ahead of tomorrow's by-elections, Corbyn damned Theresa May for putting the service in a "state of emergency".

Whenever Labour leaders are in trouble, they seek political refuge in the NHS. Jeremy Corbyn, whose party faces potential defeat in tomorrow’s Copeland and Stoke by-elections, upheld this iron law today. In the case of the former, Labour has already warned that “babies will die” as a result of the downgrading of the hospital. It is crude but it may yet prove effective (it worked for No to AV, after all).

In the chamber, Corbyn assailed May for cutting the number of hospital beds, worsening waiting times, under-funding social care and abolishing nursing bursaries. The Labour leader rose to a crescendo, damning the Prime Minister for putting the service in a “a state of emergency”. But his scattergun attack was too unfocused to much trouble May.

The Prime Minister came armed with attack lines, brandishing a quote from former health secretary Andy Burnham on cutting hospital beds and reminding Corbyn that Labour promised to spend less on the NHS at the last election (only Nixon can go to China). May was able to boast that the Tories were providing “more money” for the service (this is not, of course, the same as “enough”). Just as Corbyn echoed his predecessors, so the Prime Minister sounded like David Cameron circa 2013, declaring that she would not “take lessons” from the party that presided over the Mid-Staffs scandal and warning that Labour would “borrow and bankrupt” the economy.

It was a dubious charge from the party that has racked up ever-higher debt but a reliably potent one. Labour, however, will be satisfied that May was more comfortable debating the economy or attacking the Brown government, than she was defending the state of the NHS. In Copeland and Stoke, where Corbyn’s party has held power since 1935 and 1950, Labour must hope that the electorate are as respectful of tradition as its leader.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.