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Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers

1. Haiti is real life, not an episode of Thunderbirds (Times)

David Aaronovitch argues that there are formidable obstacles to delivering aid in Haiti. Until we develop more sophisticated forms of global co-operation we cannot expect to do much better than we have done.

2. In America's new cyberwar Google is on the front line (Guardian)

Google's clash with China shines a light on the hidden world of cybersecurity, writes Misha Glenny.

3. There's plenty of fuel, but it's going to cost us (Daily Mail)

Vince Cable says the future energy problem is not huge disruption, nor running out of supplies, but cost.

4. Class war is so last week for new Gordon Brown (Times)

Brown must be braver about school reform if he is not to find this centre ground seized from him by David Cameron, argues Rachel Sylvester.

5. Family life is a vipers' nest politicians should not poke (Guardian)

Polly Toynbee says that Cameron's plan to offer tax breaks for married couples is "unjust nonsense", but warns that Labour may struggle to win support for its stance on the family.

6. Welcome. Are you a lickspittle or a loner? (Times)

The Labour MP Chris Mullin offers advice to new party candidates.

7. Class war is meaningless when all politicians belong to an elite (Independent)

Dominic Lawson argues that "class war" has little meaning when Gordon Brown's background must seem as remote as David Cameron's to anyone near the bottom of the social heap.

8. Our prisons are in crisis, but there is a get-out-of-jail-free card (Daily Telegraph)

Mary Riddell says that the recession provides politicians with a chance to reform a penal system that is too blind and too brutal to cope with the tide of human rejects thrown its way.

9. Do the Tories get top marks? Not yet . . . (Independent)

The Tories have failed to explain how they will attract more top graduates into teaching without spending a load of extra cash, says Steve Richards.

10. When our economic interests are at stake, the war on nature resumes (Guardian)

George Monbiot says that a planned badger cull highlights man's urge to dominate the natural landscape.

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