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Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers.

1. It's time for Chilcot's team to flex their ageing muscles (Independent)

Armando Iannucci says that today we'll find out whether the Chilcot inquiry is Hutton regenerated, or something capable of fingering the culprits.

2. The real problem was Blair's policy to America, not Iraq (Guardian)

Martin Kettle argues that Tony Blair was not wrong about intervention: it was his political judgement that went badly awry. If only this was Chilcot's focus.

3. Once more unto the breach (Times)

The Times leading article pitches in, too, arguing that while today will be a compelling political spectacle, every conceivable question has already been asked of Blair. More important is the process of government and the war's aftermath.

4. The US is our ally, but we aren't its servant (Daily Telegraph)

It's clearly election season. The Liberal Democrat leader, Nick Clegg, writes in the Telegraph that our foreign policy should be designed to serve Britain's national interests, and not beholden to the "special relationship".

5. We can make you behave (Guardian)

The Conservative shadow chancellor, George Osborne, and the Tories' economics adviser Richard Thaler follow suit, setting out their plan to base government policy on behavioural economics.

6. Sri Lanka's destructive feud (Independent)

The acrimonious election campaign did not augur well for a new Sri Lanka, says the leading article. Now President Rajapaksa must move towards genuine inclusion to prevent old tensions from resurfacing.

7. The MMR battle is, sadly, not over (Times)

Nigel Hawkes says that lawyers and journalists are also culpable for the MMR vaccine controversy. The British health system was less effective as than America's in tackling it head-on.

8. Green is the colour of climate discord (Financial Times)

Fiona Harvey argues that green groups and NGOs hinder progress on climate change with their unrealistic demands, and should not be allowed to disrupt the next stage of international talks.

9. This corruption in Washington is smothering America's future (Independent)

"How do you regulate banks effectively, if the Senate is owned by Wall Street?" asks Johann Hari, He takes a look at the power of lobby groups in the US.

10. Hear the rumble of Christian hypocrisy (Times)

Richard Dawkins discusses Pat Robertson's assertion that the Haiti earthquake is punishment for sin, concluding that the evangelist is at least true to his religion.

 

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