Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers

1. There is more than cowardice that stands between Labour and regicide (Guardian)

Jonathan Freedland says that the lack of a clear challenger to Gordon Brown and the absence of an alternative programme mean that the Prime Minister is likely to survive again.

2. I know a man who can keep the New Labour flame burning (Independent)

John Rentoul argues that the next leader of the Labour Party should be -- and probably will be -- David Miliband.

3. General election 2010: time for the traditional bluster, bombast and lies (Daily Telegraph)

Simon Heffer says that both Labour and the Tories have duped the voters. He calls on Nick Clegg to provide an alternative to such deception.

4. Cameron will not break his vow on marriage (Times)

Daniel Finkelstein argues that David Cameron will not break his pledge to recognise marriage in the tax system. The Tory leader may introduce only a small tax break, but he regards the message as more important than the money.

5. The cause of our crises has not gone away (Financial Times)

John Kay warns that the conditions for a repeat of the financial crisis are in place and that even if there is a will to respond to the next crisis, the capacity to do so may not be there.

6. Walk of shame (Times)

A leader argues that while the Islamist march at Wootton Bassett may be deeply offensive, it should not be banned. The test of a fair society is how it deals with that which its majority finds objectionable.

7. High-speed rail will bleed us all for a few rich travellers (Guardian)

Simon Jenkins argues that the case for high-speed rail has yet to be proven. Upgrading and properly managing the existing railway may be better value for money than a project costing untold billions.

8. Great opportunities are open to the Liberal Democrats (Independent)

A leader says that Nick Clegg is right not to commit to either Labour or the Tories but that he must now prove his "seriousness of intent".

9. The eurozone's next decade will be tough (Financial Times)

Martin Wolf says that with no willing spender of last resort, the weaker members of the eurozone are unlikely to receive much help.

10. Marriage is no rose garden, and the Tory party knows it (Guardian)

Amelia Gentleman urges the Tories to look beyond marriage as a solution to societal breakdown. Cameron should spend whatever money there is on better schools and housing.


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France to bulldoze Calais Jungle days after child refugees arrive in the UK

The camp houses thousands. 

Refugees and migrants in Calais began queuing up for buses this morning as the French authorities plan to demolish the "Jungle" camp.

But activists fear that, unless France significantly speeds up its asylum process, the displaced people will simply move to other camps along the northern French coast.

Meanwhile, the first children of Calais brought to the UK under the Dubs Amendment arrived at the weekend.

The camp known as the Jungle, in a wasteland by the port of Calais, is actually the latest manifestation in a series of camps established since 1999, when a French reception centre became too crowded.

However, it has swelled as a result of the refugee crisis, and attempts by residents to sneak onto lorries entering the Channel Tunnel have become daily occurences. The French authorities bulldozed part of it earlier this year.

Ahead of the latest demolishment, which is expected to happen on Tuesday, Clare Moseley, founder of Care4Calais, said: “In February this year over 50 per cent of the camp was demolished and yet six months later the camp is bigger than it has ever been before. 

"This is clear evidence that demolitions do not act as a deterrent.  The refugees come because they have no choice."

Future refugees will go to other camps with even less facilities, she warned.

The camp houses thousands of residents, but because of the authorities' unwillingness to legitimise it, there is no official presence. Instead, the residents must rely on volunteer aid services and have little means to stop intruders entering. 

Although conditions in the camp can be dire, residents have created a high street with basic tent shops and restaurants catering to the needs of its displaced population. Many of those in the camp say they are there because they hope to be reunited with family in Britain, or they have given up on ever being processed by the French authorities. 

After the UK government was pressurised into passing the Dubs Amendment, which provides sanctuary to unaccompanied child refugees, some children from the camp have arrived in the UK. The first group is reportedly mostly girls from Eritrea, who will be processed at a UK immigration centre.

One of the MPs crucial to ensuring the Dubs Amendment delivered, Stella Creasy, said many more still needed help. 

Children reunited with their families under the Dublin Convention arrived in the UK last week, although their arrival was overshadowed by a debate over age checks.  

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.