Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers

1. There is more than cowardice that stands between Labour and regicide (Guardian)

Jonathan Freedland says that the lack of a clear challenger to Gordon Brown and the absence of an alternative programme mean that the Prime Minister is likely to survive again.

2. I know a man who can keep the New Labour flame burning (Independent)

John Rentoul argues that the next leader of the Labour Party should be -- and probably will be -- David Miliband.

3. General election 2010: time for the traditional bluster, bombast and lies (Daily Telegraph)

Simon Heffer says that both Labour and the Tories have duped the voters. He calls on Nick Clegg to provide an alternative to such deception.

4. Cameron will not break his vow on marriage (Times)

Daniel Finkelstein argues that David Cameron will not break his pledge to recognise marriage in the tax system. The Tory leader may introduce only a small tax break, but he regards the message as more important than the money.

5. The cause of our crises has not gone away (Financial Times)

John Kay warns that the conditions for a repeat of the financial crisis are in place and that even if there is a will to respond to the next crisis, the capacity to do so may not be there.

6. Walk of shame (Times)

A leader argues that while the Islamist march at Wootton Bassett may be deeply offensive, it should not be banned. The test of a fair society is how it deals with that which its majority finds objectionable.

7. High-speed rail will bleed us all for a few rich travellers (Guardian)

Simon Jenkins argues that the case for high-speed rail has yet to be proven. Upgrading and properly managing the existing railway may be better value for money than a project costing untold billions.

8. Great opportunities are open to the Liberal Democrats (Independent)

A leader says that Nick Clegg is right not to commit to either Labour or the Tories but that he must now prove his "seriousness of intent".

9. The eurozone's next decade will be tough (Financial Times)

Martin Wolf says that with no willing spender of last resort, the weaker members of the eurozone are unlikely to receive much help.

10. Marriage is no rose garden, and the Tory party knows it (Guardian)

Amelia Gentleman urges the Tories to look beyond marriage as a solution to societal breakdown. Cameron should spend whatever money there is on better schools and housing.

 

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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