Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers

1. A political fight set to reach well beyond Britain's election (Financial Times)

Philip Stephens says that the tensions within Tory ranks are visible and that the price of winning will be higher than David Cameron thinks.

2. We don't need this culture of overwork (Independent)

Johann Hari warns that Britain's culture of long working hours is damaging the health of its population. He calls for a French-style 35-hour week.

3. Christelle and her baby died at the hands of a callous state (Guardian)

Jenni Russell argues that the suicide of a single mother shows a welfare state unable to respond to human need.

4.. These plotters lacked both common sense and principles (Independent)

Diane Abbott says that the "coup" leaders spent so long in the New Labour bubble that they forgot they were members of the Labour Party. And she argues that the big loser from this week is David Miliband.

5. The supermarkets must be brought to heel (Daily Telegraph)

The big supermarket chains threaten farmers' livelihoods and must be tightly regulated, says Charlie Brooks.

6. The worth of a pint (Guardian)

Richard Reeves criticises the "new temperance leaders" for ignoring the significant benefits of alcohol.

7. May I introduce the bloody-minded Icelanders (Times)

Roy Hattersley says that Iceland's threat to default on its debt to Britain should come as no surprise.

8. They are right to ban the burqa, even if it is for the wrong reasons (Independent)

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown argues that Europe should follow France's lead and "rethink a garment" that cuts women off from other citizens.

9. The world must not let Sudan return to war (Financial Times)

Lazaro Sumbeiwyo and John Danforth warn that without international assistance, Sudan may slide into civil war again.

10. Unknown unknowns (Times)

A leader in the Times warns that the risk of a double-dip recession is real but that no further fiscal stimulus is possible.

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“Trembling, shaking / Oh, my heart is aching”: the EU out campaign song will give you chills

But not in a good way.

You know the story. Some old guys with vague dreams of empire want Britain to leave the European Union. They’ve been kicking up such a big fuss over the past few years that the government is letting the public decide.

And what is it that sways a largely politically indifferent electorate? Strikes hope in their hearts for a mildly less bureaucratic yet dangerously human rights-free future? An anthem, of course!

Originally by Carly You’re so Vain Simon, this is the song the Leave.EU campaign (Nigel Farage’s chosen group) has chosen. It is performed by the singer Antonia Suñer, for whom freedom from the technofederalists couldn’t come any suñer.

Here are the lyrics, of which your mole has done a close reading. But essentially it’s just nature imagery with fascist undertones and some heartburn.

"Let the river run

"Let all the dreamers

"Wake the nation.

"Come, the new Jerusalem."

Don’t use a river metaphor in anything political, unless you actively want to evoke Enoch Powell. Also, Jerusalem? That’s a bit... strong, isn’t it? Heavy connotations of being a little bit too Englandy.

"Silver cities rise,

"The morning lights,

"The streets that meet them,

"And sirens call them on

"With a song."

Sirens and streets. Doesn’t sound like a wholly un-authoritarian view of the UK’s EU-free future to me.

"It’s asking for the taking,

"Trembling, shaking,

"Oh, my heart is aching."

A reference to the elderly nature of many of the UK’s eurosceptics, perhaps?

"We’re coming to the edge,

"Running on the water,

"Coming through the fog,

"Your sons and daughters."

I feel like this is something to do with the hosepipe ban.

"We the great and small,

"Stand on a star,

"And blaze a trail of desire,

"Through the dark’ning dawn."

Everyone will have to speak this kind of English in the new Jerusalem, m'lady, oft with shorten’d words which will leave you feeling cringéd.

"It’s asking for the taking.

"Come run with me now,

"The sky is the colour of blue,

"You’ve never even seen,

"In the eyes of your lover."

I think this means: no one has ever loved anyone with the same colour eyes as the EU flag.

I'm a mole, innit.