Fox News now "most trusted" channel

US media politics gets even more polarised.

Fox News may rarely live up to its motto "Fair and balanced", but it can now describe itself as America's "most trusted news channel". A poll of more than 1,000 registered voters found that 49 per cent trust Fox, compared to 39 per cent for CNN and just 31 per cent for ABC.

The poll will relieve some of the pressure on the president of Fox, Roger Ailes, whose position was called into question after Rupert Murdoch's son-in-law Matthew Freud launched an extraordinary broadside against the channel. Freud told the New York Times:"I am by no means alone within the family or the company in being ashamed and sickened by Roger Ailes's horrendous and sustained disregard of the journalistic standards that News Corporation . . . aspires to."

Freud views Fox as a grotesque rebuke to the British tradition of impartial broadcasting, but in the US the station is seen as a dynamic alternative to its more staid rivals.

That Fox should be the most trusted news channel is perhaps not surprising in a country where the right-wing Tea Party Nation is the most popular political grouping. Fox has vast appeal in a nation that is now far more ideologically polarised than Europe.

And so long as this remains the case, it's likely that Barack Obama will continue to haemorrhage support.


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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.