Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers

1. David Cameron's Tories are a one-man band that's playing out of tune (Daily Telegraph)

Simon Heffer doubts whether Cameron's shadow cabinet will stand up to the scrutiny of an election campaign.

2. The election of a lifetime: maybe not. But the stakes are too high to tune out (Guardian)

Jonathan Freedland argues that the election will be a far more ideological contest than most commentators suggest. Labour and the Tories have utterly different conceptions of the role of government.

3. Labour has no cure for its binge hangover (Times)

Alice Thomson says that the government's latest action plan will again fail to reverse the damage done by 24-hour drinking.

4. Naval nostalgia and edgy kit are no basis for sane defence (Guardian)

Simon Jenkins argues that the head of the army, Sir David Richards, is right to dismiss the navy and air force as strategically obsolete.

5. Objections I never heard in 2003 (Independent)

The Labour MP Denis MacShane says that many of those who now excoriate Tony Blair over Iraq nevertheless supported the invasion at the time.

6. Kraft's takeover leaves a bitter taste in the mouth (Daily Telegraph)

Tracy Corrigan predicts that investors in both companies -- and the British economy -- will lose out in the US food giant's takeover of Cadbury.

7. How smoking shines a light on pack loyalty (Times)

Daniel Finkelstein says that group identity is just as important as economic incentive to the way we behave.

8. Beijing has seen the future and knows it must be green (Guardian)

Isabel Hilton argues that while China is investing in clean technology, debate on climate change in the US remains stuck in the 1950s.

9. Muslims know a fatwa can support peace rather than terrorism (Independent)

Shahid Mursaleen says that the latest edict against terrorism proves that suicide bombing is unequivocally un-Islamic.

10. A simpler protest than Billy Bragg's wheeze: switch banks (Guardian)

John Harris suggests that opening a Co-operative account is a far better way of taking action against the banks than withholding your taxes.

 

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.