Cruddas for London mayor?

Labour MP winning "high-level backing" for a bid

Today's Evening Standard reports that Jon Cruddas is winning "high-level backing" to stand as Labour's candidate against Boris Johnson in the 2012 mayoral election. It's not hard to see why. Cruddas is an exceptional campaigner with high levels of support among Labour members and the non-aligned left. As someone with an excellent record on working-class and ethnic-minority issues, he is ideally placed to run the capital.

It's thought that Cruddas will stand only if he loses his Dagenham seat (current majority: 7,605) at the next election, and while there may seem little chance of this at the moment, it would be surprising if he wasn't tempted all the same.

A Cruddas bid would pose a major threat to Ken Livingstone's hopes of recapturing City Hall in 2012. While Livingstone will be almost 67 by the time of the election, Cruddas will only be 50.

Despite persistent speculation that Cruddas plans to run for the Labour leadership following this year's general election, he has already effectively ruled himself out. In a little-noticed interview with Mary Riddell he said:

I'm not interested in Westminster, or parliament really. [The leadership] doesn't interest me. There are certain identikit characteristics which a leader has to have, and I don't have them. I don't have the certainty needed to do it. I couldn't deal with it. I have a different conception of how I want to live my life.

The opening words of this passage suggest that Cruddas, a campaigner at heart, does not long to become a great House of Commons man. The more pluralistic environment of London politics would offer him a perfect way out.

 

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Sacked Hilary Benn rules out standing for leadership but tells others "do the right thing"

Hilary Benn was sacked from Jeremy Corbyn's Shadow Cabinet overnight.

Hours after being sacked from Labour's Shadow Cabinet, Hilary Benn popped up again to issue a not-so-coded call for revolution. 

Despite being tipped as a potential rival to Jeremy Corbyn in the past, Benn downplayed his own ambitions and ruled himself out of standing for leader.

But while he described his decision to speak out as a personal one, he made it clear others who felt similarly should speak out.

Benn told Andrew Marr: "I have been a member of the lab party for 45 years. I've devoted my personal and political life to it, and if things are not working I think we have a wider responsiboility to the party that we love to speak out.

"Lots of people will say this isn't an ideal time. There's never an ideal time. I thought it was important to speak out."

Describing Corbyn as a "good and decent man", Benn said he was not a leader and agreed he should consider resigning: "I no longer have confidence in him and I think the right thing to do would be for him to take that decision."

He added: "I am not going to be a candidate for the leader of the Labour party. I haven't taken this decision because I want to. I have taken the decision becauuse I think it's the right thing to do for the Labour party."

As Benn was speaking, rumours of a Shadow Cabinet revolt was mounting, with Labour's last Scottish MP Ian Murray among those expected to resign.

But while there's no doubt Benn has the support of many of his fellow MPs, more than 169,000 ordinary members of the public have signed a petition urging support for Corbyn after Brexit. If there is a parliamentary coup, it's going to be bloody.