Why bring back Blair now?

The PM will antagonise the voters Labour needs to win back

Tucked away in the Mirror's interview today with Peter Mandelson is confirmation that Tony Blair will return to British politics to campaign for Labour in the general election.

The First Secretary of State (what a wonderfully Soviet-style title that is) revealed:

We want all the party's leadership -- past and present -- to be contributing. They know as well as anyone what is at stake for the country. Everyone will get stuck in. Everyone will campaign: Tony Blair, John Prescott, David Blunkett.

I doubt that Blair's return will do Labour any good. There is a genuine risk that the Iraq inquiry will dissuade voters who deserted the party over the war from returning to the fold. In seats such as Bethnal Green and Bow, which George Galloway's Respect took from Labour in 2005, the war is likely to return as an election issue. Blair's presence on the campaign trail will only exacerbate the damage to the party.

As the psephologist John Curtice has pointed out, voters -- regardless of their precise position on the war -- will generally be reminded of an episode of government incompetence.

To his credit, Blair, unlike Margaret Thatcher, who haunted her party as a "backseat driver", has so far refused to interfere in Labour affairs. He should not abandon this stance. The only winners from his return would be the Liberal Democrats.

 

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.