Morning call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers

1. No room at the inn? We can still be hospitable (Times)

John Sentamu, archbishop of York, compares the plight of destitute asylum seekers to Mary and Joseph, and urges compassion and hospitality.

2. How the noughties were a hinge of history (Financial Times)

Martin Wolf looks back on a decade of Western decline.

3. An optimism that has drained away (Independent)

Hamish McRae looks to the decade ahead, arguing that 10 years from now, the West will no longer call the shots.

4. University funding: Shape of cuts to come (Guardian)

The Guardian editorial spells out the potential consequences of the 6.6 per cent university cuts, and says that this points the way to a series of major cuts to come.

5. Mandelson's cuts follow years of futile expansion (Times)

Meanwhile, at the Times, Ross Clark argues that Labour has got the universities it deserves after a decade of misguided policy.

6. No time for thought (Daily Telegraph)

Fast-track degree courses will turn the clock back 20 years, and result in a two-tier education system.

7. Apprenticeships alone won't give hope to a lost generation (Independent)

While apprenticeships are a good step in tackling youth unemployment, says Anna Fazackerley, there is no point spending money and effort when they are not useful to the employer.

8. Dark matter holds the key to the universe (Guardian)

We've moved a step closer to understanding the nature of dark matter, writes Paul Davies, and thus transforming our knowledge of the cosmos itself.

9. The Neglected War (Times)

The Times leading article draws attention to Mexico's war on drugs, where celebration has quickly turned to tragedy.

10. Here are a few predictions to keep you going until new year (Independent)

Finally, Steve Richards leaves us with some political predictions for 2010.

 

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Appreciate the full horror of Nigel Farage's pro-Trump speech

The former Ukip leader has appeared at a Donald Trump rally. It went exactly as you would expect.

It is with a heavy heart that I must announce Nigel Farage is at it again.

The on-again, off-again Ukip leader and current Member of the European Parliament has appeared at a Donald Trump rally to lend his support to the presidential candidate.

It was, predictably, distressing.

Farage started by telling his American audience why they, like he, should be positive.

"I come to you from the United Kingdom"

Okay, good start. Undeniably true.

"– with a message of hope –

Again, probably quite true.

Image: Clearly hopeful (Wikipedia Screenshot)

– and optimism.”

Ah.

Image: Nigel Farage in front of a poster showing immigrants who are definitely not European (Getty)

He continues: “If the little people, if the real people–”

Wait, what?

Why is Trump nodding sagely at this?

The little people?

Image: It's a plane with the name Trump on it (Wikimedia Commons)

THE LITTLE PEOPLE?

Image: It's the word Trump on the side of a skyscraper I can't cope with this (Pixel)

THE ONLY LITTLE PERSON CLOSE TO TRUMP IS RIDING A MASSIVE STUFFED LION

Image: I don't even know what to tell you. It's Trump and his wife and a child riding a stuffed lion. 

IN A PENTHOUSE

A PENTHOUSE WHICH LOOKS LIKE LIBERACE WAS LET LOOSE WITH THE GILT ON DAY FIVE OF A PARTICULARLY BAD BENDER

Image: So much gold. Just gold, everywhere.

HIS WIFE HAS SO MANY BAGS SHE HAS TO EMPLOY A BAG MAN TO CARRY THEM

Image: I did not even know there were so many styles of Louis Vuitton, and my dentists has a lot of old copies of Vogue.

Anyway. Back to Farage, who is telling the little people that they can win "against the forces of global corporatism".

 

Image: Aaaaarggghhhh (Wikipedia Screenshot)

Ugh. Okay. What next? Oh god, he's telling them they can have a Brexit moment.

“... you can beat Washington...”

“... if enough decent people...”

“...are prepared to stand up against the establishment”

Image: A screenshot from Donald Trump's Wikipedia page.

I think I need a lie down.

Watch the full clip here:

Stephanie Boland is digital assistant at the New Statesman. She tweets at @stephanieboland