Trafigura story disappears from BBC website

Newsnight investigation withdrawn from website

Carter-Ruck may have suffered a humiliating defeat when it attempted to prevent the Guardian and others from reporting on parliament, but it never abandoned its attempt to sue the BBC's Newsnight over a feature on the alleged dumping of toxic waste by Trafigura.

Now Newsnight has apparently removed a video of the investigation from its website. Bloggers have attempted to evade the gag by posting a YouTube video of the feature and have attacked BBC executives for caving in to Carter-Ruck's client's assault on free expression.

Other media organisations, including the Times and the Independent, have previously withdrawn stories about the case, but this may mark the first time the BBC has removed material on the story.

The Newsnight press office was not responding to calls at the time of publication.

Update: Judith Townend of journalism.co.uk has heard from a BBC spokesperson, who said: "We haven't got anything to say on this. As discussed earlier we are often not able to comment if there's a live legal action."

 

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Keir Starmer's Brexit diary: Why doesn't David Davis want to answer my questions?

The shadow Brexit secretary on the resignation of Sir Ivan Rogers, the Prime Minister's speech and tracking down his opposite in government. 

My Brexit diary starts with a week of frustration and anticipation. 

Following the resignation of Sir Ivan Rogers, I asked that David Davis come to Parliament on the first day back after recess to make a statement. My concern was not so much the fact of Ivan’s resignation, but the basis – his concern that the government still had not agreed negotiating terms and so the UKRep team in Brussels was under-prepared for the challenge ahead. Davis refused to account, and I was deprived of the opportunity to question him. 

However, concerns about the state of affairs described by Rogers did prompt the Prime Minister to promise a speech setting out more detail of her approach to Brexit. Good, we’ve had precious little so far! The speech is now scheduled for Tuesday. Whether she will deliver clarity and reassurance remains to be seen. 

The theme of the week was certainly the single market; the question being what the PM intends to give up on membership, as she hinted in her otherwise uninformative Sophy Ridge interview. If she does so in her speech on Tuesday, she needs to set out in detail what she sees the alternative being, that safeguards jobs and the economy. 

For my part, I’ve had the usual week of busy meetings in and out of Parliament, including an insightful roundtable with a large number of well-informed experts organised by my friend and neighbour Charles Grant, who directs the Centre for European Reform. I also travelled to Derby and Wakefield to speak to businesses, trade unions, and local representatives, as I have been doing across the country in the last 3 months. 

Meanwhile, no word yet on when the Supreme Court will give its judgement in the Article 50 case. What we do know is that when it happens things will begin to move very fast! 

More next week. 

Keir