Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers

1. Better to have no deal at Copenhagen than one that spells catastrophe (Guardian)

Naomi Klein warns that a climate change deal that limits the rise in average global temperatures to 2C would be disastrous for Africa.

2. Why new challenges need new people (Financial Times)

Martin Wolf says that the "post post-Thatcher era" requires politicians who have the flexibility to recognise new challenges. Gordon Brown now has to prove he can do so.

3. For a balanced verdict on Blair, look beyond Chilcot (Independent)

John Rentoul argues that the Chilcot inquiry is being intimidated into passing an unduly critical verdict on Blair.

4. Heroes of New Labour (Economist)

Bagehot names the outstanding figures of the New Labour era, including Lord Adonis, Donald Dewar, Lord Mandelson and Robin Cook.

5. The influence of Prince Charles the lobbyist is out of hand (Times)

Paul Richards argues that our deference to the crown prevents us from questioning "the secret relationship" between the heir to the throne and government ministers.

6. A perfectly proper Prince (Daily Telegraph)

But a leader in the Telegraph says that Charles has a duty to take a close interest in government policy, and calls on republicans to declare their true motives.

7. A global order swept away in the rapids of history (Financial Times)

Philip Stephens says that the choice now is between a world of co-operative multilaterism or one of narrow nationalism.

8. Not even Cameron can control the politics of anger (Guardian)

Martin Kettle predicts that, if elected, Cameron will struggle to cope with a hostility towards politicians "almost revolutionary" in its force.

9. A toxic childhood won't be cured in school (Times)

Alice Thomson says that Ed Balls should blame parents for the materialism of school children.

10. Gamblers who must be punished (Independent)

Paul Collier argues that bankers who take excessive risks should be criminalised.

 

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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.