Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers

1. Better to have no deal at Copenhagen than one that spells catastrophe (Guardian)

Naomi Klein warns that a climate change deal that limits the rise in average global temperatures to 2C would be disastrous for Africa.

2. Why new challenges need new people (Financial Times)

Martin Wolf says that the "post post-Thatcher era" requires politicians who have the flexibility to recognise new challenges. Gordon Brown now has to prove he can do so.

3. For a balanced verdict on Blair, look beyond Chilcot (Independent)

John Rentoul argues that the Chilcot inquiry is being intimidated into passing an unduly critical verdict on Blair.

4. Heroes of New Labour (Economist)

Bagehot names the outstanding figures of the New Labour era, including Lord Adonis, Donald Dewar, Lord Mandelson and Robin Cook.

5. The influence of Prince Charles the lobbyist is out of hand (Times)

Paul Richards argues that our deference to the crown prevents us from questioning "the secret relationship" between the heir to the throne and government ministers.

6. A perfectly proper Prince (Daily Telegraph)

But a leader in the Telegraph says that Charles has a duty to take a close interest in government policy, and calls on republicans to declare their true motives.

7. A global order swept away in the rapids of history (Financial Times)

Philip Stephens says that the choice now is between a world of co-operative multilaterism or one of narrow nationalism.

8. Not even Cameron can control the politics of anger (Guardian)

Martin Kettle predicts that, if elected, Cameron will struggle to cope with a hostility towards politicians "almost revolutionary" in its force.

9. A toxic childhood won't be cured in school (Times)

Alice Thomson says that Ed Balls should blame parents for the materialism of school children.

10. Gamblers who must be punished (Independent)

Paul Collier argues that bankers who take excessive risks should be criminalised.

 

Follow the New Statesman team on Twitter

Getty Images.
Show Hide image

Tom Watson rouses Labour's conference as he comes out fighting

The party's deputy leader exhilarated delegates with his paean to the Blair and Brown years. 

Tom Watson is down but not out. After Jeremy Corbyn's second landslide victory, and weeks of threats against his position, Labour's deputy leader could have played it safe. Instead, he came out fighting. 

With Corbyn seated directly behind him, he declared: "I don't know why we've been focusing on what was wrong with the Blair and Brown governments for the last six years. But trashing our record is not the way to enhance our brand. We won't win elections like that! And we need to win elections!" As Watson won a standing ovation from the hall and the platform, the Labour leader remained motionless. When a heckler interjected, Watson riposted: "Jeremy, I don't think she got the unity memo." Labour delegates, many of whom hail from the pre-Corbyn era, lapped it up.

Though he warned against another challenge to the leader ("we can't afford to keep doing this"), he offered a starkly different account of the party's past and its future. He reaffirmed Labour's commitment to Nato ("a socialist construct"), with Corbyn left isolated as the platform applauded. The only reference to the leader came when Watson recalled his recent PMQs victory over grammar schools. There were dissenting voices (Watson was heckled as he praised Sadiq Khan for winning an election: "Just like Jeremy Corbyn!"). But one would never have guessed that this was the party which had just re-elected Corbyn. 

There was much more to Watson's speech than this: a fine comic riff on "Saturday's result" (Ed Balls on Strictly), a spirited attack on Theresa May's "ducking and diving; humming and hahing" and a cerebral account of the automation revolution. But it was his paean to Labour history that roused the conference as no other speaker has. 

The party's deputy channelled the spirit of both Hugh Gaitskell ("fight, and fight, and fight again to save the party we love") and his mentor Gordon Brown (emulating his trademark rollcall of New Labour achivements). With his voice cracking, Watson recalled when "from the sunny uplands of increasing prosperity social democratic government started to feel normal to the people of Britain". For Labour, a party that has never been further from power in recent decades, that truly was another age. But for a brief moment, Watson's tubthumper allowed Corbyn's vanquished opponents to relive it. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.