Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's papers

1. Better to have no deal at Copenhagen than one that spells catastrophe (Guardian)

Naomi Klein warns that a climate change deal that limits the rise in average global temperatures to 2C would be disastrous for Africa.

2. Why new challenges need new people (Financial Times)

Martin Wolf says that the "post post-Thatcher era" requires politicians who have the flexibility to recognise new challenges. Gordon Brown now has to prove he can do so.

3. For a balanced verdict on Blair, look beyond Chilcot (Independent)

John Rentoul argues that the Chilcot inquiry is being intimidated into passing an unduly critical verdict on Blair.

4. Heroes of New Labour (Economist)

Bagehot names the outstanding figures of the New Labour era, including Lord Adonis, Donald Dewar, Lord Mandelson and Robin Cook.

5. The influence of Prince Charles the lobbyist is out of hand (Times)

Paul Richards argues that our deference to the crown prevents us from questioning "the secret relationship" between the heir to the throne and government ministers.

6. A perfectly proper Prince (Daily Telegraph)

But a leader in the Telegraph says that Charles has a duty to take a close interest in government policy, and calls on republicans to declare their true motives.

7. A global order swept away in the rapids of history (Financial Times)

Philip Stephens says that the choice now is between a world of co-operative multilaterism or one of narrow nationalism.

8. Not even Cameron can control the politics of anger (Guardian)

Martin Kettle predicts that, if elected, Cameron will struggle to cope with a hostility towards politicians "almost revolutionary" in its force.

9. A toxic childhood won't be cured in school (Times)

Alice Thomson says that Ed Balls should blame parents for the materialism of school children.

10. Gamblers who must be punished (Independent)

Paul Collier argues that bankers who take excessive risks should be criminalised.

 

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Theresa May is paying the price for mismanaging Boris Johnson

The Foreign Secretary's bruised ego may end up destroying Theresa May. 

And to think that Theresa May scheduled her big speech for this Friday to make sure that Conservative party conference wouldn’t be dominated by the matter of Brexit. Now, thanks to Boris Johnson, it won’t just be her conference, but Labour’s, which is overshadowed by Brexit in general and Tory in-fighting in particular. (One imagines that the Labour leadership will find a way to cope somehow.)

May is paying the price for mismanaging Johnson during her period of political hegemony after she became leader. After he was betrayed by Michael Gove and lacking any particular faction in the parliamentary party, she brought him back from the brink of political death by making him Foreign Secretary, but also used her strength and his weakness to shrink his empire.

The Foreign Office had its responsibility for negotiating Brexit hived off to the newly-created Department for Exiting the European Union (Dexeu) and for navigating post-Brexit trade deals to the Department of International Trade. Johnson was given control of one of the great offices of state, but with no responsibility at all for the greatest foreign policy challenge since the Second World War.

Adding to his discomfort, the new Foreign Secretary was regularly the subject of jokes from the Prime Minister and cabinet colleagues. May likened him to a dog that had to be put down. Philip Hammond quipped about him during his joke-fuelled 2017 Budget. All of which gave Johnson’s allies the impression that Johnson-hunting was a licensed sport as far as Downing Street was concerned. He was then shut out of the election campaign and has continued to be a marginalised figure even as the disappointing election result forced May to involve the wider cabinet in policymaking.

His sense of exclusion from the discussions around May’s Florence speech only added to his sense of isolation. May forgot that if you aren’t going to kill, don’t wound: now, thanks to her lost majority, she can’t afford to put any of the Brexiteers out in the cold, and Johnson is once again where he wants to be: centre-stage. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.