The Sun says... sorry to Barry George

Man acquitted of Jill Dando's murder awarded "substantial" payout

Barry George, the man acquitted of killing Jill Dando, has been awarded "substantial" damages and an apology from the publisher of the Sun and the News of the World.

George, who has a personality disorder, spent eight years in jail for the shooting of the BBC TV presenter before being acquitted at a retrial last year. He gave an interview because, his lawyer said: "He knew there would be a clamour from the press for his story and he wanted to satisfy the demands of the press . . . and be left in peace."

However, the articles, which appeared in the Sun and the News of the World between August and November 2008, suggested that he could still be guilty of the murder and that he had been stalking other women.

News Group Newspapers has now admitted that the articles:

. . . would have been understood to mean that there were grounds to suspect Mr George of the murder despite his acquittal. It accepts that the verdict of the second jury in acquitting Mr George was correct and it apologises to Mr George for any suggestion otherwise.

The NotW went so far as to say that George had told the newspaper: "I didn't kill Jill Dando -- I was stalking someone else at the time." It now accepts that he never made this statement.

In the own words of his own counsel, George was convicted because he was "the local loner, the local nutter", a stigma that clearly continued to dog him after his conviction. It's a sad demonstration of the kind of thing that makes the British tabloid press notorious worldwide.

The argument for reform of the UK's libel laws -- and particularly their abuse by big corporations to curtail criticism -- is gaining speed. It's good to see them being put to proper use here to protect an individual's reputation from unfair attack.

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

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PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn hammers David Cameron on green energy – but skips Syria

In a low-key exchange ahead of the Autumn Statement, the Labour leader covered two areas where the government is vulnerable: renewable energy and women's refuges. However, he failed to mention Syria and the Russian plane shot down by Turkey.

When PMQs precedes an Autumn Statement or Budget it is usually a low-key affair, and this one was no different. But perhaps for different reasons than the usual – the opposition pulling its punches to give room for hammering the government on the economy, and the Prime Minister saving big announcements and boasts for his Chancellor.

No, Jeremy Corbyn's decision to hold off on the main issue of the day – air strikes in Syria and the Russian military jet shot down by Turkey – was tactical. He chose to question the government on two areas where it is vulnerable: green energy and women's refuges closing due to cuts. Both topics on which the Tories should be ashamed of their record.

This also allowed him to avoid the subject that is tearing the Middle East – and the Labour party – apart: how to tackle Isis in Syria. Corbyn is seen as soft on defence and has been criticised for being too sympathetic to Russia, so silence on both the subject of air strikes and the Russian plane was his best option.

The only problem with this approach is that the government's most pressing current concern was left to the SNP leader Angus Robertson, who asked the Prime Minister about the dangers of action from the air alone in Syria. A situation that frames Labour as on the fringe of debates about foreign and defence policy. Luckily for Corbyn, this won't really matter as no one pays attention to PMQs pre-Autumn Statement.

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.