Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers

1. The road from Copenhagen (Guardian)

The Climate and Energy Secretary, Ed Miliband, admits the failings of the Copenhagen summit and defends the successes, exploring how to go forward. He urges the green movement "not to lose heart and momentum".

2. After the catastrophe in Copenhagen, it's up to us (Independent)

Johann Hari berates politicians at Copenhagen for their failure and calls for collective action: "a mass movement of ordinary democratic citizens" can make the "impossible" happen.

3. Copenhagen was the MPs' expenses scandal writ large (Daily Telegraph)

Over at the Telegraph, Matthew d'Ancona says Copenhagen "dramatised the gulf between political class and public". He urges leaders to focus more on convincing climate change sceptics.

4. Failed state (Times)

It is dangerous to ignore the ongoing crisis in Somalia, the Times leader says. The west must act to tackle the growing Islamisation of a brutalised populace in a lawless state.

5. Dogged Brown can still upset Cameron's enigma variations (Guardian)

Jackie Ashley says that if Labour found new energy we could still see a hung parliament next year, although as things stands, she still expects a Conservative majority government.

6. The end of Britain's long weekend (Financial Times)

Max Hastings looks ahead to Christmas in 2010 and 2011, arguing that things will be much worse, as a Conservative government will "fail in its responsibility" if it does not drastically cut public-sector jobs and allow businesses to go bust.

7. Sickness in health (Times)

Victims of medical negligence deserve redress, and the lawyers who act for them need to be paid, says the Times, but both payouts and legal fees should be in proportion.

8. We must bring in a better law on self-defence (Daily Telegraph)

The Munir Hussain case raises questions about our right to defend our property and person, and this right should be safeguarded, except where it is grossly disproportionate.

9. Eurostar was not just a mechanical breakdown (Independent)

The breakdown of Eurostar over the weekend raises grave questions about our emergency planning, according to the Independent.

10. Heed the great stabiliser's words on banking (Times)

William Rees-Mogg says we should listen to Paul Volcker, Barack Obama's economic adviser, who wants a return to Glass-Steagall rules: the move is right for both Wall Street and the City.

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Tom Watson rouses Labour's conference as he comes out fighting

The party's deputy leader exhilarated delegates with his paean to the Blair and Brown years. 

Tom Watson is down but not out. After Jeremy Corbyn's second landslide victory, and weeks of threats against his position, Labour's deputy leader could have played it safe. Instead, he came out fighting. 

With Corbyn seated directly behind him, he declared: "I don't know why we've been focusing on what was wrong with the Blair and Brown governments for the last six years. But trashing our record is not the way to enhance our brand. We won't win elections like that! And we need to win elections!" As Watson won a standing ovation from the hall and the platform, the Labour leader remained motionless. When a heckler interjected, Watson riposted: "Jeremy, I don't think she got the unity memo." Labour delegates, many of whom hail from the pre-Corbyn era, lapped it up.

Though he warned against another challenge to the leader ("we can't afford to keep doing this"), he offered a starkly different account of the party's past and its future. He reaffirmed Labour's commitment to Nato ("a socialist construct"), with Corbyn left isolated as the platform applauded. The only reference to the leader came when Watson recalled his recent PMQs victory over grammar schools. There were dissenting voices (Watson was heckled as he praised Sadiq Khan for winning an election: "Just like Jeremy Corbyn!"). But one would never have guessed that this was the party which had just re-elected Corbyn. 

There was much more to Watson's speech than this: a fine comic riff on "Saturday's result" (Ed Balls on Strictly), a spirited attack on Theresa May's "ducking and diving; humming and hahing" and a cerebral account of the automation revolution. But it was his paean to Labour history that roused the conference as no other speaker has. 

The party's deputy channelled the spirit of both Hugh Gaitskell ("fight, and fight, and fight again to save the party we love") and his mentor Gordon Brown (emulating his trademark rollcall of New Labour achivements). With his voice cracking, Watson recalled when "from the sunny uplands of increasing prosperity social democratic government started to feel normal to the people of Britain". For Labour, a party that has never been further from power in recent decades, that truly was another age. But for a brief moment, Watson's tubthumper allowed Corbyn's vanquished opponents to relive it. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.