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Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers

1. The road from Copenhagen (Guardian)

The Climate and Energy Secretary, Ed Miliband, admits the failings of the Copenhagen summit and defends the successes, exploring how to go forward. He urges the green movement "not to lose heart and momentum".

2. After the catastrophe in Copenhagen, it's up to us (Independent)

Johann Hari berates politicians at Copenhagen for their failure and calls for collective action: "a mass movement of ordinary democratic citizens" can make the "impossible" happen.

3. Copenhagen was the MPs' expenses scandal writ large (Daily Telegraph)

Over at the Telegraph, Matthew d'Ancona says Copenhagen "dramatised the gulf between political class and public". He urges leaders to focus more on convincing climate change sceptics.

4. Failed state (Times)

It is dangerous to ignore the ongoing crisis in Somalia, the Times leader says. The west must act to tackle the growing Islamisation of a brutalised populace in a lawless state.

5. Dogged Brown can still upset Cameron's enigma variations (Guardian)

Jackie Ashley says that if Labour found new energy we could still see a hung parliament next year, although as things stands, she still expects a Conservative majority government.

6. The end of Britain's long weekend (Financial Times)

Max Hastings looks ahead to Christmas in 2010 and 2011, arguing that things will be much worse, as a Conservative government will "fail in its responsibility" if it does not drastically cut public-sector jobs and allow businesses to go bust.

7. Sickness in health (Times)

Victims of medical negligence deserve redress, and the lawyers who act for them need to be paid, says the Times, but both payouts and legal fees should be in proportion.

8. We must bring in a better law on self-defence (Daily Telegraph)

The Munir Hussain case raises questions about our right to defend our property and person, and this right should be safeguarded, except where it is grossly disproportionate.

9. Eurostar was not just a mechanical breakdown (Independent)

The breakdown of Eurostar over the weekend raises grave questions about our emergency planning, according to the Independent.

10. Heed the great stabiliser's words on banking (Times)

William Rees-Mogg says we should listen to Paul Volcker, Barack Obama's economic adviser, who wants a return to Glass-Steagall rules: the move is right for both Wall Street and the City.