Morning Call: pick of the comment

The ten must-read pieces from this morning's newspapers

1. The road from Copenhagen (Guardian)

The Climate and Energy Secretary, Ed Miliband, admits the failings of the Copenhagen summit and defends the successes, exploring how to go forward. He urges the green movement "not to lose heart and momentum".

2. After the catastrophe in Copenhagen, it's up to us (Independent)

Johann Hari berates politicians at Copenhagen for their failure and calls for collective action: "a mass movement of ordinary democratic citizens" can make the "impossible" happen.

3. Copenhagen was the MPs' expenses scandal writ large (Daily Telegraph)

Over at the Telegraph, Matthew d'Ancona says Copenhagen "dramatised the gulf between political class and public". He urges leaders to focus more on convincing climate change sceptics.

4. Failed state (Times)

It is dangerous to ignore the ongoing crisis in Somalia, the Times leader says. The west must act to tackle the growing Islamisation of a brutalised populace in a lawless state.

5. Dogged Brown can still upset Cameron's enigma variations (Guardian)

Jackie Ashley says that if Labour found new energy we could still see a hung parliament next year, although as things stands, she still expects a Conservative majority government.

6. The end of Britain's long weekend (Financial Times)

Max Hastings looks ahead to Christmas in 2010 and 2011, arguing that things will be much worse, as a Conservative government will "fail in its responsibility" if it does not drastically cut public-sector jobs and allow businesses to go bust.

7. Sickness in health (Times)

Victims of medical negligence deserve redress, and the lawyers who act for them need to be paid, says the Times, but both payouts and legal fees should be in proportion.

8. We must bring in a better law on self-defence (Daily Telegraph)

The Munir Hussain case raises questions about our right to defend our property and person, and this right should be safeguarded, except where it is grossly disproportionate.

9. Eurostar was not just a mechanical breakdown (Independent)

The breakdown of Eurostar over the weekend raises grave questions about our emergency planning, according to the Independent.

10. Heed the great stabiliser's words on banking (Times)

William Rees-Mogg says we should listen to Paul Volcker, Barack Obama's economic adviser, who wants a return to Glass-Steagall rules: the move is right for both Wall Street and the City.

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As crime moves online, the police need the investment in technology to follow

Technology offers solutions, not just threats.

It’s perhaps inevitable that as the world becomes more digital, so does crime. This week Alison Saunders, director of public prosecutions, recognised that online crime is as serious as face-to-face crime. “Hate is hate,” Saunders wrote referring to internet abuse, and the police should protect people from it wherever they are. This will add demand to under-pressure police forces. And it is only the tip of the iceberg. 

Forty-seven per cent of crime involves an online element. Police recorded 30,000 instances of online stalking and harassment last year. People are 20 times more likely to be a victim of fraud than robbery, costing businesses an estimated £144bn a year. On a conservative estimate, 2,500 UK citizens use the anonymous dark web browser, Tor, for illegal purposes such as drug dealing, revenge porn and child sexual exploitation.

The police need new technology to meet demand, a Reform report published today finds. Some progress has been made in recent years. West Midlands Police uses an online portal for people to report incidents. Durham uses evidence-gathering software to collect social media information on suspects, and then instantly compile a report that can be shared with courts. Police have benefited from smartphones to share information, and body-worn cameras, which have reduced complaints against police by 93 per cent.

Yet, Theresa May’s 2016 remarks that police use “technology that lags woefully behind what they use as consumers” still stand. Officers interviewed for Reform’s research implored: “Give us the tools to do our job”.

Online evidence portals should be upgraded to accept CCTV footage. Apps should be developed to allow officers to learn about new digital threats, following the US army’s library of knowledge-sharing apps. Augmented-reality glasses are being used in the Netherlands to help officers identify evidence at digital crime scenes. Officers would save a trip back to the station if they could collect fingerprints on smartphones and statements on body-worn cameras.

New technology requires investment, but forces are reducing the resources put into IT as reserves have dried up. Durham plans to cut spend by 60 per cent between 2015-16 and 2019-20. The government should help fund equipment which can meet demand and return future productivity savings. If the Home Office invested the same as the Department of Health, another department pushing “transformative” technology, it would invest an extra £450m a year. This funding should come from administrative savings delivered through accelerating the Government’s automation agenda, which the think tank Reform has previously calculated would save Whitehall £2.6bn a year.

As crime moves online, police must follow. Saunders is right to point to the importance of meeting it. But technology offers solutions, not just threats. Installing the next generation of equipment will give police the tools to do their jobs, addressing online hate and more. 

Alexander Hitchcock is a senior researcher at reform