The social impact of cult groups

Allen Tate Wood argues that destructive cult groups are exerting unjust control over their members -

The impact of cult groups on society and the influence they exercise cannot and should not be underestimated. For anecdotal proof of this assertion, I refer the reader to a famous picture of former President Ronald Regan holding up a copy of the Washington Times circa 1982. The quote below the boldly claims, “This is the only newspaper I read”.

The Washington Times, however, was the brainchild of Sun Myung Moon. Had Regan taken the time to do more than the crossword puzzle and paid attention to more than just the cartoons, he might have discovered that Sun Myung Moon, a Korean industrialist and self-proclaimed saviour of the world, had spoken at length of his plans to end democracy in the United States. Ironically, Mr. Moon has been one of the chief supporters of Ronald Regan, George Bush and George W. Bush.

The Thirteenth Amendment put a formal end to slavery in the United States and its territories. In the last quarter century, however, many groups in the United States, i.e. paramilitary organizations, destructive cults, gangs, and criminal organizations have used the mantle of religion and along with it the protections and guarantees of the First Amendment in a deliberate strategy designed to defraud the innocent, the unwary, and the unsophisticated out of the protections guaranteed by the Thirteenth Amendment.

These same malefactors, in carrying out the mandates of their ends-justifies-the-means philosophy, have perverted the intent of the First Amendment by using it as a shield against criminal prosecution .The smoke-screen diversion is always the same: a battle cry against “religious persecution.” Neither the Constitution nor the Bill of Rights grants immunity from prosecution to religious leaders or groups who violate the laws of the land. On the contrary, fraud laws, banking and currency laws, as well as immigration and naturalization laws all work together to indirectly promote involuntary servitude, a type of slavery that serves as the lifeblood of many destructive cults.

Increasingly sophisticated technology of influence and persuasion is falling into the hands of destructive cult leaders, pyramid sales organizations, gang members and criminal organizations. To make matters worse, the social and economic conditions all over the world have people looking for easy answers, which leaves them vulnerable to the quick-fix philosophy espoused by cults and other groups. The denial attending this wide spread social phenomenon is baffling, heartrending and frightening .

The justice department’s failure to prosecute monolithic pseudo religious organizations, which continue to operate with impunity, only contributes to the growing cynicism of the youth culture, which increasingly sees government simply as the handmaiden of wealth and power.

For further information, please visit the following sites:

http://www.allentwood.com/

http://www.freedomofmind.com/

Allen Tate Wood has spent the last 30 years helping cult victims and their families overcome the negative influence of destructive cults. An authority on the subject, Wood has been invited to speak at universities all over North American and Europe.
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PMQs review: Theresa May shows how her confidence has grown

After her Brexit speech, the PM declared of Jeremy Corbyn: "I've got a plan - he doesn't have a clue". 

The woman derided as “Theresa Maybe” believes she has neutralised that charge. Following her Brexit speech, Theresa May cut a far more confident figure at today's PMQs. Jeremy Corbyn inevitably devoted all six of his questions to Europe but failed to land a definitive blow.

He began by denouncing May for “sidelining parliament” at the very moment the UK was supposedly reclaiming sovereignty (though he yesterday praised her for guaranteeing MPs would get a vote). “It’s not so much the Iron Lady as the irony lady,” he quipped. But May, who has sometimes faltered against Corbyn, had a ready retort. The Labour leader, she noted, had denounced the government for planning to leave the single market while simultaneously seeking “access” to it. Yet “access”, she went on, was precisely what Corbyn had demanded (seemingly having confused it with full membership). "I've got a plan - he doesn't have a clue,” she declared.

When Corbyn recalled May’s economic warnings during the referendum (“Does she now disagree with herself?”), the PM was able to reply: “I said if we voted to leave the EU the sky would not fall in and look at what has happened to our economic situation since we voted to leave the EU”.

Corbyn’s subsequent question on whether May would pay for single market access was less wounding than it might have been because she has consistently refused to rule out budget contributions (though yesterday emphasised that the days of “vast” payments were over).

When the Labour leader ended by rightly hailing the contribution immigrants made to public services (“The real pressure on public services comes from a government that slashed billions”), May took full opportunity of the chance to have the last word, launching a full-frontal attack on his leadership and a defence of hers. “There is indeed a difference - when I look at the issue of Brexit or any other issues like the NHS or social care, I consider the issue, I set out my plan and I stick to it. It's called leadership, he should try it some time.”

For May, life will soon get harder. Once Article 50 is triggered, it is the EU 27, not the UK, that will take back control (the withdrawal agreement must be approved by at least 72 per cent of member states). With MPs now guaranteed a vote on the final outcome, parliament will also reassert itself. But for now, May can reflect with satisfaction on her strengthened position.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.