A 'conscious' revolution

Being alive does not mean simply going through the motions. One must learn to live consciously and i

Gnosis aspires to restore inside each one of us the capacity to learn how to live consciously and intelligently. This is not possible if we do not work on ourselves, if something does not die in us (we are referring to the mystical death). The three factors for the revolution of the consciousness are birth, death and sacrifice.

In every authentic transformation there exists death and birth simultaneously. Each one of us has a mistaken creation in our interior; it is essential to destroy the false, so that a new, truer creation may arise.

"If the seed does not die, the plant can not be born"; when the death of the "Ego" is absolute, that which must be born is also absolute. We must, therefore, destroy the causes of ignorance so that authentic wisdom is born within us.

The mystical death refers to the death of the psychological egos. Egos are defects in human psychology and cause negative behaviour in human beings. The negative energy of the egos manifests in this world in the form of hatred, greed, jealousy, lust, envy, gluttony and laziness.

The egos cause unsocial actions, selfishness, crimes, wars etc. We need to observe ourselves objectively to find out what is negative within us and what needs changing. Change is not possible without internal observation first.

Once a mistake has been recognised we can begin to eliminate it from our psychology with personal effort and help from our Inner Being. Nobody can change us, we need to change ourselves.

If after some time one does not understand the Doctrine of the Many “I’s”, it is due exclusively to a lack of practice in self-observation. When somebody gradually practices interior self-observation, he discovers for himself little by little a crowd of people, a lot of selves which live in his personality.

The Birth of a human is initiated with the creative energies of a loving couple. The creative energies are powerful. They do not only create a human but also regenerate us physically and spiritually.

It enables us to experience the reality of other dimensions beyond the physical world. Everybody can learn how to use and control the creative energies. This requires conscious management of the energies, and love and honesty which come from the heart.

Sacrifice means working for humanity, and this is for instance represented by the work carried out by the Gnostic Institute of Anthropology, the members of which receive no renumeration for the delivery of the esoteric teachings, but nevertheless sacrifice their time and effort to do so.

Giles Oatley lectures in forensic statistics, data mining and decision support systems for crime detection and prevention. He has also worked in the care sector for several years with adults with challenging behaviour and severe learning difficulties. He chairs the Gnostic Institute of Anthropology.
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How the Lib Dems learned to love all-women shortlists

Yes, the sitting Lib Dem MPs are mostly white, middle-aged middle class men. But the party's not taking any chances. 

I can’t tell you who’ll be the Lib Dem candidate in Southport on 8 June, but I do know one thing about them. As they’re replacing a sitting Lib Dem (John Pugh is retiring) - they’ll be female.

The same is true in many of our top 20 target seats, including places like Lewes (Kelly-Marie Blundell), Yeovil (Daisy Benson), Thornbury and Yate (Clare Young), and Sutton and Cheam (Amna Ahmad). There was air punching in Lib Dem offices all over the country on Tuesday when it was announced Jo Swinson was standing again in East Dunbartonshire.

And while every current Lib Dem constituency MP will get showered with love and attention in the campaign, one will get rather more attention than most - it’s no coincidence that Tim Farron’s first stop of the campaign was in Richmond Park, standing side by side with Sarah Olney.

How so?

Because the party membership took a long look at itself after the 2015 election - and a rather longer look at the eight white, middle-aged middle class men (sorry chaps) who now formed the Parliamentary party and said - "we’ve really got to sort this out".

And so after decades of prevarication, we put a policy in place to deliberately increase the diversity of candidates.

Quietly, over the last two years, the Liberal Democrats have been putting candidates into place in key target constituencies . There were more than 300 in total before this week’s general election call, and many of them have been there for a year or more. And they’ve been selected under new procedures adopted at Lib Dem Spring Conference in 2016, designed to deliberately promote the diversity of candidates in winnable seats

This includes mandating all-women shortlists when selecting candidates who are replacing sitting MPs, similar rules in our strongest electoral regions. In our top 10 per cent of constituencies, there is a requirement that at least two candidates are shortlisted from underrepresented groups on every list. We became the first party to reserve spaces on the shortlists of winnable seats for underrepresented candidates including women, BAME, LGBT+ and disabled candidates

It’s not going to be perfect - the hugely welcome return of Lib Dem grandees like Vince Cable, Ed Davey and Julian Huppert to their old stomping grounds will strengthen the party but not our gender imbalance. But excluding those former MPs coming back to the fray, every top 20 target constituency bar one has to date selected a female candidate.

Equality (together with liberty and community) is one of the three key values framed in the preamble to the Lib Dem constitution. It’s a relief that after this election, the Liberal Democratic party in the Commons will reflect that aspiration rather better than it has done in the past.

Richard Morris blogs at A View From Ham Common, which was named Best New Blog at the 2011 Lib Dem Conference

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