George Osborne doesn't like it if your blinds are down in the morning

Other Tory initiatives include "fold your clothes better", "tidy your room" and "call your grandmother more often, she likes to talk to you."

George Osborne told the Today programme that:

It is unfair that [a] person leaves their home early in the morning and they pull the door behind them and they are going to do their job and they look at their next-door neighbour, the blinds are down and that family is living a life on benefits. That is unfair as well and we are going to tackle that as part of tackling this country's economic problems.

The rhetoric has moved beyond simple scapegoating of the poor, and on to silliness. For the benefit of Osborne, here are other reasons why your neighbour may have their blinds down while you head to work:

  • They may leave their blinds down for security reasons
  • They may leave their blinds down because they leave home before it gets light
  • They may leave their blinds down because they leave home before their children wake up
  • They may leave their blinds down because they don't want light in their house
  • They may leave their blinds down because they work from home and don't need to take a punishing commute
  • They may leave their blinds down because they work a night shift and only just got back home before you left for work
  • They may leave their blinds down because their disability means they require more sleep than people who have the good fortune to be healthy
  • They may leave their blinds down because they don't want to raise them and don't really understand why that is now the test of whether or not they are thought of as "living a life on benefits"

If you're wondering why Osborne decided to pick on that particular example, well. Just look at his neighbour's house:

Blinds. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.