Binyamin Netanyahu, Iran, and the cartoon bomb

The US has a long history of terrible visual aids.

Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu gave a speech to the UN last night in which he called on the collected member states to set a "clear, red line" beyond which Iran could not take its supposed ambitions to make a nuclear bomb.

The premier illustrated his remarks by drawing a red line on a cartoon bomb with a permanent marker.

Binyamin Netanyahu demonstrates where the international community should draw a red line. Photograph: Getty Imagess

The line should, he said, be drawn at 90 per cent of the way to bomb creation, a point which he believed Iran would reach in "next spring, at most by next summer."

Binyamin Netanyahu draws a red line. Photograph: Getty Images

Binyamin Netanyahu, after drawing said red line, glares at assembled delegates. Photograph: Getty Images

In making creative use of props, Netanyahu is merely joining in with the political culture in the United States, where the UN building is based. Iowa Republican Senator Chuck Grassley, for instance, famously gave an entire budget response based around the metaphor of slaying the "debt and deficit dragon":

In 2006, Senator Debbie Stabenow experienced what Politico called "self-immolation by poster" when she spoke with a sign that appeared to declare that she was "Dangerously Incompetent":

And when fighting President Obama's healthcare plan, the House Republicans used an anti-visual-aid when John Boehner appeared with a flowchart that made the reform look dangerously, incomprehensibly complex:

Binyamin Netanyahu and an Acme brand bomb. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
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Britain is running out of allies as it squares up to Russia

For whatever reason, Donald Trump is going to be no friend of an anti-Russia foreign policy.

The row over Donald Trump and that dossier rumbles on.

Nothing puts legs on a story like a domestic angle, and that the retired spy who compiled the file is a one of our own has excited Britain’s headline writers. The man in question, Christopher Steele, has gone to ground having told his neighbour to look after his cats before vanishing.

Although the dossier contains known errors, Steele is regarded in the intelligence community as a serious operator not known for passing on unsubstantiated rumours, which is one reason why American intelligence is investigating the claims.

“Britain's role in Trump dossier” is the Telegraph’s splash, “The ‘credible’ ex-MI6 man behind Trump Russia report” is the Guardian’s angle, “British spy in hiding” is the i’s splash.

But it’s not only British headline writers who are exercised by Mr Steele; the Russian government is too. “MI6 officers are never ex,” the Russian Embassy tweeted, accusing the UK of “briefing both ways - against Russia and US President”. “Kremlin blames Britain for Trump sex storm” is the Mail’s splash.

Elsewhere, Crispin Blunt, the chair of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee, warns that relations between the United Kingdom and Russia are as “bad as they can get” in peacetime.

Though much of the coverage of the Trump dossier has focused on the eyecatching claims about whether or not the President-Elect was caught in a Russian honeytrap, the important thing, as I said yesterday, is that the man who is seven days from becoming President of the United States, whether through inclination or intimidation, is not going to be a reliable friend of the United Kingdom against Russia.

Though Emanuel Macron might just sneak into the second round of the French presidency, it still looks likely that the final choice for French voters will be an all-Russia affair, between Francois Fillon and Marine Le Pen.

For one reason or another, Britain’s stand against Russia looks likely to be very lonely indeed.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.