Binyamin Netanyahu, Iran, and the cartoon bomb

The US has a long history of terrible visual aids.

Israeli prime minister Binyamin Netanyahu gave a speech to the UN last night in which he called on the collected member states to set a "clear, red line" beyond which Iran could not take its supposed ambitions to make a nuclear bomb.

The premier illustrated his remarks by drawing a red line on a cartoon bomb with a permanent marker.

Binyamin Netanyahu demonstrates where the international community should draw a red line. Photograph: Getty Imagess

The line should, he said, be drawn at 90 per cent of the way to bomb creation, a point which he believed Iran would reach in "next spring, at most by next summer."

Binyamin Netanyahu draws a red line. Photograph: Getty Images

Binyamin Netanyahu, after drawing said red line, glares at assembled delegates. Photograph: Getty Images

In making creative use of props, Netanyahu is merely joining in with the political culture in the United States, where the UN building is based. Iowa Republican Senator Chuck Grassley, for instance, famously gave an entire budget response based around the metaphor of slaying the "debt and deficit dragon":

In 2006, Senator Debbie Stabenow experienced what Politico called "self-immolation by poster" when she spoke with a sign that appeared to declare that she was "Dangerously Incompetent":

And when fighting President Obama's healthcare plan, the House Republicans used an anti-visual-aid when John Boehner appeared with a flowchart that made the reform look dangerously, incomprehensibly complex:

Binyamin Netanyahu and an Acme brand bomb. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty Images/Carl Court
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Nigel Farage: welcoming refugees will lead to "migrant tide" of jihadists

Ukip's leader Nigel Farage claims that housing refugees will allow Isis to smuggle in "jihadists".

Nigel Farage has warned that granting sanctuary to refugees could result in Britain being influenced by Isis. 

In remarks that were immediately condemned online, the Ukip leader said "When ISIS say they will flood the migrant tide with 500,000 of their own jihadists, we'd better listen", before saying that Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor, had done something "very dangerous" in attempting to host refugees, saying that she was "compounding the pull factors" that lead migrants to attempt the treacherous Mediterranean crossing.

Farage, who has four children, said that as a father, he was "horrified" by the photographs of small children drowned on a European beach, but said housing more refugees would simply make the problem worse. 

The Ukip leader, who failed for the fifth successive occassion to be elected as an MP in May, said he welcomed the prospect of a Jeremy Corbyn victory, describing it as a "good result". Corbyn is more sceptical about the European Union than his rivals for the Labour leadership, which Farage believes will provide the nascent Out campaign with a boost. 

 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.