US politics from outside the beltway

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US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

US Supreme Court. Credit: Getty Images

 

1. The Supreme Court lands in Oz (Wall Street Journal)
Barack Obama, a wizard of another kind, has been trying with fulminations and denunciations to keep anyone from attempting what a law professor might call discovery of what the president actually has done in the past three years, says Daniel Henniger.
 
2. It’s Mitt! Oh no (New York Times)
That sound you hear is the sound of despair —  the hard swallowing and deep breathing by reluctant Republicans crossing their fingers and praying for the best, writes Charles Blow.
 
Because Christians have a realistic and non-utopian view of human nature, they should be especially alive to the ambiguities and ambivalences of politics, says E.J. Dionne Jr.
 
4. Down the insurance rabbit hole (New York Times)
As a scholar of social policy at M.I.T., I teach students how the system works. Now I am learning, in real time, says Andrea Louise Campbell.
 
Doyle McManus says Obama and Romney could step out of their comfort zones and address issues that don't fit so neatly into partisan talking points. They still have six months to try it.
 
6. The drug legalization dilemma (Washington Post)
Legalization would mean drugs of reliable quality would be conveniently available from clean stores for customers not risking the stigma of breaking the law in furtive transactions with unsavory people, writes George Will.
 
Just as al-Maliki forced us to do the right thing, we should allow Karzai to take control of his country as soon as he wants, says Lawrence Korb.
 
8. Making Greece work (Wall Street Journal) (£)
Since Galileo's day, we Europeans have learned to question things beyond the obvious and to look beneath the surface. We have learned to search for clues, not evils—for answers, not culprits, says this editorial.
 
9. An unholy mix (Chicago Tribune)
Making the Almighty synonymous with political conservatism breeds contempt for faith. Young people now are far more likely alienated from religion than their forebears were, says Steve Chapman.
 
10. US must improve cybersecurity (Houston Chronicle)
China shouldn't necessarily be a hostile enemy; it is an ambitious, and sometimes unscrupulous, competitor. And it is doing everything in its power to help itself. By failing to create a strong cyber-defense strategy, the United States is helping, too, says this editorial.