US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. A farewell to Newt (New York Times)

Gingrich has no nutritional value, certainly not at this point, as he peddles his ludicrous guarantee of $2.50-a-gallon gasoline, a promise that would be made only by someone with his own bottomless strategic reserve of crude, says Frank Bruni.

2. Monti pulls a Thatcher (Wall Street Journal)

Postwar Italian politics has chewed up more than a few would-be reformers while career politicians and union leaders enjoy the spoils of power, says this editorial.

3. Politicians giving religion a bad name (Washington Post)

They jostle to claim a divine calling. They appear in the pulpit with pastors who talk ignorantly of America as a "Christian nation." Some, when they lose, hint darkly of anti-religious persecution, says Michael Gerson.

4. Step to the center (New York Times)

Let's have another round in the debate about how centralized American government should be. Let's watch liberals and conservatives duke it out, writes David Brooks.

5. The US can make all the difference in Syria (Washington Post)

If the United States finally acts, Russia will throw a fit. Pity. But more importantly, so will Iran. Syria is virtually its puppet state, writes Richard Cohen.

6. Stony Brook calendar change need not fuel rhetoric on religion (Newsday)

In religious matters, all of us -- believers or not -- ought to slow down our I'm-offended reflex and lower the volume of our rhetoric, says this editorial.

7. Time to better secure radioactive materials (Cleveland Plain Dealer)

It is vital that world leaders attending the Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul this week agree to strengthen measures to prevent nuclear and other radioactive material from falling into the wrong hands, writes Yukiya Amano.

8. Revoke this license to kill (Miami Herald)

The law is poorly understood, unevenly applied throughout the state and, worst of all, has become a license to kill under a variety of suspect circumstances, says this editorial.

9. Obama's secret plan (Washington Times)

Mr. Obama has dangerous ideas up his sleeve, says Brett M Decker.

10. Hitting reset on the 2012 presidential race (Politico)

Alex Castellanos asks: Why has this been such a pathetically small, soulless, despicable campaign for the Republican nomination?

Newt Gingrich. Credit: Getty Images
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When Donald Trump talks, remember that Donald Trump almost always lies

Anyone getting excited about a trade deal between the United States and the United Kingdom should pay more attention to what Trump does, not what he says. 

Celebrations all round at the Times, which has bagged the first British newspaper interview with President-Elect Donald Trump.

Here are the headlines: he’s said that the EU has become a “vehicle for Germany”, that Nato is “obsolete” as it hasn’t focused on the big issue of the time (tackling Islamic terrorism), and that he expects that other countries will join the United Kingdom in leaving the European Union.

But what will trigger celebrations outside of the News Building is that Trump has this to say about a US-UK trade deal: his administration will ““work very hard to get it done quickly and done properly”. Time for champagne at Downing Street?

When reading or listening to an interview with Donald Trump, don’t forget that this is the man who has lied about, among other things, who really paid for gifts to charity on Celebrity Apprentice, being named Michigan’s Man of the Year in 2011, and making Mexico pay for a border wall between it and the United States. So take everything he promises with an ocean’s worth of salt, and instead look at what he does.   

Remember that in the same interview, the President-Elect threatened to hit BMW with sanctions over its decision to put a factory in Mexico, not the United States. More importantly, look at the people he is appointing to fill key trade posts: they are not free traders or anything like it. Anyone waiting for a Trump-backed trade deal that is “good for the UK” will wait a long time.

And as chess champion turned Putin-critic-in-chief Garry Kasparov notes on Twitter, it’s worth noting that Trump’s remarks on foreign affairs are near-identical to Putin’s. The idea that Nato’s traditional purpose is obsolete and that the focus should be on Islamic terrorism, meanwhile, will come as a shock to the Baltic states, and indeed, to the 650 British soldiers who have been sent to Estonia and Poland as part of a Nato deployment to deter Russian aggression against those countries.

All in all, I wouldn’t start declaring the new President is good news for the UK just yet.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.